Tag: 苏州桑拿

Bordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgery

first_imgThe deployment of the J750 has been enabled thanks to funding from three partners: the European Union, the Regional Council of Nouvelle Aquitaine and the Bordeaux University Foundation, of which the CHU is a part. Source:Stratasys Jul 15 2019Bordeaux University Hospital (CHU) in France is leading the charge to improve success rates of complex kidney tumor removal surgery, thanks to unique full-color, multi-material 3D printing technology. The CHUis currently one of the only hospitals worldwide to use a Stratasys J750– the world’s only full-color, multi-material 3D printer – for complex kidney tumor removal cases. The 3D printed models are also used to enhance the explanatory process towards patients, as well as improve surgeon training.Support from patientsRelated StoriesStratasys’ new J720 Dental 3D printer sets new standards for digital dentistryStratasys advanced FDM 3D printing helps Biodonostia to improve treatment for thoracic wall tumorsStratasys and Materialise bring 3D printed medical models to lifeOne such patient is Carole Ridel, who recently underwent surgery at the CHU. “I was shown a 3D printed model of my kidney prior to my operation and instantly felt more reassured than I had been before surgeries I had undergone in the past,” she explains. “Seeing such a realistic representation allowed me to understand the process much better than an MRI scan. I noticed that the tumors were on the external wall of the kidney, rather than inside the organ itself, so I was comforted by realizing the situation wasn’t as bad as I had imagined.”Collaborative project to improve communication with patientsUsing its J750 3D Printer, CHU also recently created a collaborative research project entitled Rein 3D Print, which aims to determine whether boosting patient understanding of their surgical procedure can improve ambulatory care (same-day surgery that doesn’t necessitate an overnight stay). According to Prof. Bernhard, 3D-printed model shave contributed to the success of this pilot protocol and have reduced patient hospitalization times during pre-surgery planning. The surgical team at the CHU’sDepartment of Urology and Kidney Transplantationis3D printing life-like transparent and color models of the patient’s anatomy to help perform precise and successful kidney-sparing surgery and improve patient outcomes.Jean-Christophe Bernhard, Urology Professor at Bordeaux University Hospital, says the clearer view offered by the 3D printed model helps identify and avoid damage to the delicate nearby arteries and vessels which, in the case of complex or high-volume tumors, can result in a patient’s kidney being completely removed.Sparing the patient’s kidney is important because it reduces the chance of subsequently suffering from chronic kidney disease. Having a 3D-printed model comprising the patient’s kidney tumor, main arteries and vessels – each in a different color – provides an accurate picture of what we will see during operations. The ability to visualize the specific location of a tumor in relation to these other elements, all in three dimensions, greatly facilitates our surgical planning and is not easily achievable from a 2D scan.”Jean-Christophe Bernhard, Urology Professor, Bordeaux University Hospital The clearer view offered by a transparent, full-color 3D printed model increases the ability to perform precise and successful kidney-sparing Describing kidney tumor removal with a 2D scan or diagram will invariably leave most patients somewhat bewildered. Presenting them with a 3D printed model that clearly shows the tumor puts them at ease and enables the patient to grasp exactly what we’re going to do. Indeed, initial research from patient questionnaires shows that having 3D printed models increases their understanding of the surgery by up to 50%, so it’s a considerable benefit in terms of overall patient care.”Prof. Jean-Christophe Bernhardlast_img read more

3D scanners can help young women focus on body appreciation

first_imgRelated StoriesBiden calling ACA ‘breakthrough’ for mental health parity highlights gapsPerinatal depression screenings may overlook women having suicidal ideationOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchIn her study, young adult women between the ages of 18 and 25 were scanned in a 3D scanner used by researchers and students in MU’s Department of Textile and Apparel Management. The researchers used modeling software to convert the scans to 3D avatars. Participants then digitally “painted” body parts that they appreciated for various reasons such as their utility or role in their relationships.”In digitally painting their avatars, women could think about how, for example, their thighs help them run or how their arms can help hold others in an embrace,” Ramseyer Winter said. “It provided the participants a way to visual their bodies in a completely different way. It allowed the participants to recognize how our bodies are much more than a size or a number on a scale.”Immediately and then again three months after digitally painting their avatars, participants reported increased body appreciation over time. Moreover, participants reported lower depressive and anxiety symptoms.”While more research still needs to be done on the relationship between the 3D image intervention we used and its impact on mental health, we did see a significant effect on body appreciation,” Ramseyer Winter said. “Prior research has shown that body appreciation is related to depression and anxiety, which leads us to think that we are on the right track in creating an intervention that can improve not only body image, but mental health as well.”Future research will look at how painting the 3D avatars impacts young women with more severe depression.Antoinette Landor, co-director of the Center for Body Image Research and Policy, co-authored the study. Other MU researchers who worked on the project were Michelle Teti, Kristen Morris, Erin Schliep, Danielle Pevehouse-Pfeiffer and Emily Pekarek.The study is part of the newly created Center for Body Image Research and Policy, an interdisciplinary research center housed in the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences. The center was built around the goal to improve body image, health and wellness for individuals, families and communities. Source:University of Missouri-Columbia 3D body image scanning is a relatively new tool in social science research, and the research on using 3D tools for improving body image is scant. We wanted to see if it could provide a way to help young women shift their focus away from appearance and toward function.”Virginia Ramseyer Winter, Director of the MU Center for Body Image Research and Policy Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 21 20193D technology has transformed movies and medical imaging, and now it might be able to help young women better appreciate their bodies.Virginia Ramseyer Winter, assistant professor in the School of Social Work and director of the MU Center for Body Image Research and Policy, is a nationally recognized body image expert. In a new study, she found that images from 3D scanners can be used to help young women focus on body appreciation, which might in turn improve mental health.last_img read more

LA to become first in US to install subway body scanners

first_img Citation: LA to become first in US to install subway body scanners (2018, August 14) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-la-subway-body-scanners.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Body scanners being piloted in Los Angeles subway system In this Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018 file photo ThruVision suicide vest-detection technology reveals an suspicious object on a man, at left, during a Transportation Security Administration demonstration in New York’s Penn Station. Los Angeles is poised to have the first mass transit system in the U.S. with body scanners that screen passengers for weapons and explosives. Officials from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Transportation Security Administration have scheduled a Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, news conference. The TSA has been working on the experimental devices, known as standoff explosive detection units, since 2004 with transit agencies. They hadn’t been deployed permanently at any transit hub. (AP Photo/Richard Drew,File)center_img © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Transportation Security Administration had been testing several different types of body scanners for about a year.The scanners that are being deployed are portable, and project waves to do a full-body screening of passengers walking through a station without slowing them down.The machines, which scan for metallic and non-metallic objects on a person’s body, can detect suspicious items from 30 feet (9 meters) away and have the capability of scanning more than 2,000 passengers per hour, said Brian Haas, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.The TSA tested body scanners in New York’s Penn Station in February and has also conducted tests at Union Station in Washington, D.C., and at a New Jersey Transit station during the 2014 Super Bowl.In December, a Bangladeshi immigrant injured himself by setting off a crude pipe bomb strapped to his chest in a subway passageway near Times Square in New York City.Metro has previously tested several different types of body scanners, including airport-style screening systems where passengers walk through a scanner. The pilot program was meant to evaluate the accuracy and capacity of the portable machines.About 150,000 passengers ride on Metro’s Red Line daily and the subway system counted more than 112 million rides last year. The Los Angeles subway system will become the first in the U.S. to install body scanners that screen passengers for weapons and explosives, officials said Tuesday.last_img read more

Geographic location biggest indicator of mobile app preferences

first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain Provided by University College London Across the globe smartphones and mobile apps have become an integral part of everyday life, but what determines the apps you use? Socio-economic factors also play an important role when considering mobile usage. The study shows that occupation, education, and how much a person has in savings, are the next most important factors in determining what apps a person will use. Socio-economic factors are more important than age and gender.People of similar socio-economic status tend to use their smartphones in a similar way across the globe. This is particularly true for people of similar household status, living with or without children, and is also true for professionals and well-educated people.Dr. Ella Peltonen, lead author on the study and postdoctoral research fellow at the Insight Centre for Data Analytics, Ireland, said: “The results of our work show that there is a strong relationship between the type of apps people use and their geographic and socio-economic factors, suggesting that these different factors should be taken into account when studying mobile data. In addition, our results can be used to better target mobile apps in different countries, and for personalisation.”Dr. Musolesi concluded: “The findings of this research can be exploited in many contexts, not only commercial ones. We can use this information for better targeting applications for positive behaviour intervention or civic participation. One specific application domain is digital health, where understanding which applications are popular in a certain region for a specific socio-economic group is of fundamental importance for effective and systematic actions such as for disease prevention, vaccination campaigns or mental health interventions at local and national level.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Ella Peltonen et al. The hidden image of mobile apps, Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services – MobileHCI ’18 (2018). DOI: 10.1145/3229434.3229474center_img App usage soars as smartphones take hold A new study involving UCL reveals that the country you live in rather than your demographic data is actually the biggest indicator of the types of apps you download and use. The study, conducted in collaboration with the Insight Centre for Data Analytics, Ireland, University of Helsinki, Finland, and Lancaster University, UK, will be presented at the MobileHCI 2018 conference in Barcelona, Spain, September 3-6. Researchers found that English-speaking countries, including the UK, USA, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, as well as Japan and South Korea had the highest app usage, with the lowest app usage being found in Argentina, the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Pakistan and India.Dr. Mirco Musolesi, who leads the UCL Intelligent Social System Lab (UCL Geography), said: “Previously studies have not focused on geographic and cultural factors behind app usage, instead choosing to focus on usage patterns and behaviour.”Our research highlights that even if mobile communications and hyper-connectivity are a global phenomenon, the country we live in plays a huge part in determining our app preferences. Understanding how and when people use phones, and which apps they engage with, is important for the study of individual behaviour and society at large.”The team applied large-scale analysis of geographic, cultural, and demographic factors in mobile usage, using data from 25,323 Android users who used 54,776 mobile applications in 44 countries across Europe, Americas, Asia and Oceania.While Hofstede’s Value Survey Model was used to determine cross-cultural preferences, finding that masculine cultures, as determined by the model, with more pronounced gender roles, like Japan prefer Personalization apps that help users to more easily customise their device, while collectivist cultures and those with more fluid gender roles such as Russia seem to value Family related categories, such as Education and Parenting applications. “Individualist” cultures such as the US favoured Entertainment apps and other leisure related categories, such as Travel & Local, Sports, Health and Fitness, and Music and Audio. The most popular categories for the UK are Communication apps, Social, Travel & Local, and News & Magazines. The researchers also observed that the UK is characterised by an application usage pattern that is closer to other English-speaking countries and more distant from that observed in countries in continental Europe. Explore further Citation: Geographic location biggest indicator of mobile app preferences (2018, September 5) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-apps.htmllast_img read more

Mass tax trickery cost Europe 55 bln euros report

first_img German software giant SAP raises dividend So-called “cum-ex” and “cum-cum” deals—complex stock transactions around the days when companies pay out dividends—have cost taxpayers as much as 55 billion euros ($63 billion) in lost revenue or outright fraud since 2001.The schemes were first uncovered in Germany in 2012.But beyond Europe’s largest economy, Thursday’s investigation found evidence of the practices in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Denmark, Belgium, Austria, Finland, Norway and Switzerland.Accounting for the bulk of the total at 46 billion euros, technically legal “cum-cum” tax avoidance exploits varying treatment of domestic and foreign shareholders.Foreign investors holding shares in a company temporarily sell the stock to a bank based in the same country as the firm ahead of the day dividend gets paid out.This allows them to escape higher taxes on the dividend charged to shareholders from abroad, before buying back their holdings quickly afterwards.Such deals deprived Germany of 24.6 billion euros in tax revenue, France 17 billion and Italy 4.5 billion, according to the investigation led by investigative journalism website Correctiv with big-name outlets like German public broadcaster ARD and French newspaper Le Monde.Criminal investigationsMeanwhile, clearly fraudulent “cum-ex” deals draw in more parties in a complex dance around the taxman.Reportedly conceived by well-known German lawyer Hanno Berger, the cum-ex method relies on several investors buying and selling shares in a company amongst themselves around the day when the firm pays out its dividend.The stock changes hands so quickly that the tax authorities are unable to identify who is the true owner.Working together, the investors can claim multiple rebates for tax paid on the dividend and share out the profits amongst themselves—with the treasury footing the bill.This practice cost Germany 7.2 billion euros, Denmark 1.7 billion and Belgium 201 million, the investigation found.Since 2012 six criminal investigations have been opened in Germany, including against tax lawyer Berger and several stock market traders.Norway’s tax authority told AFP that it had uncovered a fraud worth 580,000 crowns ($70,533 or 61,304 euros) in 2013 and blocked several later attempts after a warning from Denmark.The country has since strengthened its surveillance, it added.Meanwhile Danish prosecutors have been studying tax practices around dividends since 2015 and are examining “whether there is a basis for criminal proceedings against people or companies involved,” spokesman Simon Gosvig said.Pierre Moscovici, European Commissioner for economic and financial affairs, tweeted in response to the investigation that European tax authorities should share more information and improve transparency.”If the fraudsters’ imagination is limitless, my determination is as well!” he wrote. Two closely-related tax schemes have helped banks and investors avoid tax or even syphon cash directly out of European treasuries totalling billions more than previously thought, an investigation by 19 media revealed Thursday. So-called “cum-ex” and “cum-cum” deals were first uncovered in Germany in 2001, while a 2018 media investigation found evidence of the practices in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Denmark, Belgium, Austria, Finland, Norway and Switzerland © 2018 AFPcenter_img Explore further Citation: Mass tax trickery cost Europe 55 bln euros: report (2018, October 18) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-mass-tax-trickery-europe-bln.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more