Tag: 南京桑拿

POWERADE ISOTONIC SEQTL ROUND SEVEN WRAP

first_imgRound Seven of the PowerAde Isotonic South East Queensland Touch League (SEQTL) was played at the Brisbane Metropolitan Touch Association’s Whites Hill Complex on Friday 27 July 2007.In Men’s Open action, Dodgers continued on their winning way at the top of the Men’s competition with a solid 5-3 victory over University-Rebels in the 7.20pm clash.Dodgers’ New Zealand Men’s Open playmaker Leon Skinner was in dazzling touch for the Coast boys who worked hard to eventually fend off a spirited challenge from Uni-Rebels.2006 Queensland Mixed Open standout Damian Moar was Uni-Rebels best player and a constant threat with his silky handling skills a highlight of the game.Colts recent good form was rewarded with a 4-2 triumph over Southern Storm in the 8.10pm timeslot.Nathan Smith and Australian Youth Squad member Jason Schmidt had outstanding games for Colts, whilst Storm’s Queensland Men’s Open lynchpin Ryan Pollock, playing consistently good touch in 2007, was again his team’s best player.In the late timeslot at 9.00pm, Country Club United (CCU) produced a professional 6-3 win over Tigers.Hard working CCU stalwart Luke “Chucksy” Parker and the skillful Luke Feldman were dominant for the Northsiders, whilst Charles Seeto was again the pick of a vanquished, but willing Tigers team.Round Seven of the PowerAde Isotonic SEQTL Women’s Open began with the early clash at 7.20pm between Crushers and Dodgers.After a tight first half where both teams created numerous chances, Dodgers finished off better to go the break 2-0 up.Amy Turner, Nicola Slade, and Rachel Stevenson called the shots for Dodgers and they ran out 4-0 winners with a composed display in the second half.National 20 Years Youth Squad member Belinda “Bindoss” Hammett was Crushers best, whilst Tasmanian tyro Emma Haines, making her debut for the tri-colours, and Kathrine “Dooie” Moore led from the front.In the 8.10pm clash, defending premiers Uni-Rebels completed a 4-1 victory over Colts to reclaim top spot in the division.Colts were without their rock, Australian Women’s Open star Peta Rogerson, who has been far and away the competition’s most dominant player in season 2007.Rogerson’s absence was keenly felt by an out of sorts Colts combination who struggled without her input and direction.Uni-Rebels were full of running with Renee Murphy, National Youth squad member Alyce “The Rat” Hulbert, and Toni Elthrington leading the way for Rebels in a performance that smacked of the consistency and combination that the premiers had been lacking to this point.Colts 2007 Australian World Cup Mixed Open Captain Mary “Pasher” Steele, Meg Ballon, and Nikki Etheridge never stopped trying and the loss may be a timely one as Colts take stock and gear up for semi-final action in coming weeks.In the late game at 9.00pm, the Southern Storm produced a gritty 5-3 win over traditional arch rivals Country Club United.Storm’s Queensland and Australian Women’s Open Captain Sharyn “Billy” Williams came out firing and looks to be finding good form at the right time of the season as she steered her young chargers through a tough clash with the experienced CCU team.Young Storm middle Kirsty “Harry” Quince played with poise and maturity, and along with Sam Hopkin and veteran Angela Barr, were the Storm’s best players.CCU dug deep and pushed the southsiders hard with National 18 Years Girls squad members Gen “SG” Lacaze, Kelly Jones, and the experienced Nat Parker leading the CCU charge.In Round Eight of the PowerAde Isotonic SEQTL Men’s Open competition this Friday 3 August 2007, Tigers take on Storm at 7.20pm, CCU meet Dodgers in the 2006 grand final replay at 810pm, and Colts confront Uni-Rebels at 9.00pm.In PowerAde Isotonic SEQTL Women’s Open Round Eight action, CCU will meet Uni-Rebels at 7.20pm; Storm play Crushers at 8.10pm, and Colts will battle with Dodgers in the late game at 9.00pm.With just three weeks of regular season fixtures remaining, all teams are looking to consolidate their games and build into the finals race with good form under their belts.Men’s and Women’s Division two and three A and B fixtures also continue this Friday night with first games commencing at 6.30pm.last_img read more

Winnipeg church facing controversy after opposing smudging ceremony

first_imgAPTN National NewsA Winnipeg church is facing criticism after refusing to allow a smudging ceremony to take place on its property.That refusal led to the cancelling of a fundraising event which was meant to highlight the ongoing relationship with Indigenous people.APTN’s Dennis Ward has this story.last_img

Ohio State mens womens cross country teams aim for Big Ten championship

The Ohio State men’s and women’s cross country teams both finished in the top half of the field at the Notre Dame Invitational on Friday. Running in South Bend, Ind., the men placed 12th out of 26 teams in the 8K race and the women took 13th place in a 28-team field 5K race on Sept. 30. While both team’s coaches said they are happy with their teams’ performances, they believe the results could have been better. The men, led by junior Donny Roys, who finished 24th with a time of 24:44, saw their top runner, senior Jake Edwards, not finish. Edwards had a hamstring spasm and dropped around the four-mile mark of a five-mile race. “We were really high up there through three miles. And then Jake dropped out. That’s a 70, 75-point swing,” men’s coach Robert Gary said. “You know, I’m a little disappointed, but it shows that we’re a pretty solid team.” The men finished with a total score of 326, ahead of Penn State who had 343 points in 14th place. When Edwards dropped out, he was in the top 30 of 175 runners. OSU’s fifth runner, senior Adam Green, ran a 25:28 and finished 96th. Senior Jordan Jennewine finished first for the women in 37th with a 17:42. The women had a total score of 366, behind Big Ten foe Penn State who finished in fourth place. Women’s assistant coach Chris Neal said he thought the team ran well at the beginning of the race but didn’t have a strong second mile. “The big thing for us was getting out fast and I think through the mile, we had six girls in the top forty. After that we kind of fell apart,” Neal said. “We just have to clean up the middle of our effort and we’ll be where we want to be.” Both teams were running against highly ranked competition. The No.25-ranked men’s team ran against seven top-30 opponents, including No. 3 Stanford and No. 10 Florida State. The women competed against six top-30 teams. The Big Ten championship meet on Oct. 30 is now less than a month away. Jennewine, the women’s number one runner, said her team needs to run well as a pack. “I’d say as a team our strength has been that we can all bunch together and finish close with a short spread,” Jennewine said. “I think we need to just move the pack up.” A top-three finish is in sight for both teams at the Big Ten championship meet. “I think Wisconsin and Indiana are probably a step ahead of the rest of the conference,” Gary said. “I think there are probably three or four schools, Minnesota, Penn State, who we beat today, and probably Illinois. I think those three teams plus ourselves are fighting for third place.” Neal said Michigan is the team to beat in the women’s conference, but believes a top-three finish is in reach for the Buckeyes. “I think with Penn State, us, Minnesota and Iowa, it’s just going to be one of those years where on a good day you can be third but on a bad day you’re sitting in eighth,” Neal said. Both teams are confident heading into the thick of the season. “I think we’re right on track to get into the top three at the Big Ten championships,” Roys said of the men. “We’re stronger than last year so we’re getting out. I think we’re right on pace right now.” Jennewine likes how her team is improving as the season goes on. “I think we’re definitely moving forward and getting better each week,” she said. The men and women will take a week off from competition and then travel to Wisconsin for the Wisconsin Adidas Invitational on Oct. 14. read more

Cold streak stifles Ohio State in loss to Kansas

There are cold streaks and then there’s what happened to the Ohio State men’s basketball team Saturday against Kansas. Trailing by two at halftime, the Buckeyes shot just 25 percent from the field and 11 percent from the 3-point line in the second half, including a stretch of more than 10 minutes in which they didn’t make a field goal. The Buckeyes made four of their first 25 shots in the second half, allowing No. 9 Kansas to pull away for a 74-66 victory against No. 7 OSU. The frigidity of the Buckeyes shooting did not affect Kansas’ Ben McLemore, who many project to be a lottery pick in the 2013 NBA Draft. The Jayhawks’ star redshirt freshman scored 22 points and was one of four Jayhawks to reach double figures. When junior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. finally ended another dry spell for the Buckeyes with a jump shot with 2:18 left in the game, the sold-out crowd at the Schottenstein Center let out a sarcastic cheer that was more a release of frustration than a celebration. The Buckeyes, behind junior forward Deshaun Thomas and sophomore guard Shannon Scott put up a battle, but their 16 and 15 points, respectively, weren’t enough for OSU to earn its first quality win of the season. Kansas took control from the opening tip, flustering OSU with full court pressure in the early going. Two 3-pointers from sophomore guard Sam Thompson kept OSU in it, but Kansas overpowered the Buckeyes inside to jump out to an 11-6 lead with 14:37 remaining in the first half. That’s when Scott entered the game and he made his presence immediately felt. After a 3-pointer from Thomas, the sophomore guard drove to his right past two defenders and laid in a tough shot off the glass. He then stole the ensuing inbounds pass and was fouled going to the rim, making one of two free throws. Later in the half, Scott scored seven points in a 14-0 run by the Buckeyes that saw the home team take its first lead of the game, 31-23. But McLemore proved to be too much for the Buckeyes, though. Kansas’ leading scorer hit three 3-pointers in the first half and scored five straight points in the period’s final minute to help give his team a, 37-35 lead at intermission. McLemore led all scorers at half with 13 points, while Scott chipped in 10 and also dished out three assists. Kansas had their way with OSU inside doubling up the Buckeyes, 20-10, on points from the paint in the first half. OSU fought their way back in the second half, though. Thomas, as he’s been known to do, went on a scoring binge, putting in eight points in the second half’s first seven minutes to help knot up the score at 45 with 13:31 left in the game. The crowd rose to its feet, but that’s when the Buckeyes, who shot 46 percent from behind the arc in the first half started their half-long shooting hibernation. OSU missed eight of their first nine 3-point shots in the second half and Kansas jumped out to a 53-48 lead. When sophomore forward Amir Williams banked in a layup with 8:14 remaining to cut the lead to three, it was OSU’s first made field goal in more than 10 minutes and the Jayhawk lead continued to grow. Down double digits with more under two minutes remaining, OSU was forced to foul, but Kansas’ free throw shooting was enough to put the game away. The loss drops the Buckeyes record to 9-2 as Kansas leaves Columbus 10-1. OSU next plays Chicago State next Saturday at the Schottenstein Center. read more

Mens Hockey Mason Jobst looks to lead Buckeyes back to tournament

Ohio State forward Mason Jobst holds off a Wisconsin forward as he crashes into senior goaltender Matt Tomkins during a Big Ten tournament semifinal game at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit. OSU lost 2-1. Credit: Courtesy of Ric KruszynskiIt would seem that this year could potentially be a step back for the No. 19 Ohio State men’s hockey team, but junior forward Mason Jobst is looking to do his part to avoid any possible regression.The Buckeyes come into this season off their first NCAA tournament bid since 2009. But after a first-round overtime loss to then-No. 2 Minnesota-Duluth, the team lost three goalies and much of its top talent, which included captain and forward Nick Schilkey, who led the team in goals with 27. Jobst is returning from a dominant sophomore campaign in which he tallied 19 goals and 36 assists, led the Big Ten in points with 55 and earned second team All-American honors. Now coming into his junior year, Jobst said while he looks to improve, his goals are more team-oriented.“I think it’s just improving on the last year, being more productive than I was last year,“ Jobst said. “It was a tough loss in the first round of the NCAAs and the second round of the [Big Ten tournament], so just trying push to get further in that, and hopefully win the Big Ten Championship and win a national championship.”Western Michigan assistant coach Todd Krygier still remembers the years he spent coaching Jobst with the United States Hockey League’s Muskegon Lumberjacks in junior hockey. He remembers not only the leadership of Jobst, but also the speed, playmaking ability and hockey IQ as standing out on the ice.“His character was off the charts,” Krygier said. “His work ethic, his ability to get along with others and pull a team together and lead a team on and off the ice was absolutely fantastic.”Krygier added that in his time as Jobst’s coach, the now standout forward received little recognition from other teams and that Ohio State was one of the only teams that reached out to him.“I talked to several NCAA teams over the couple years that I coached him, and Ohio State was the only team that listened,” Krygier said. “So congrats to Ohio State, they obviously made a great decision.”Jobst was named captain for the Buckeyes Wednesday. But Krygier said Jobsts’ leadership had been obvious to him for years prior as he was a captain on Muskegon for his final two seasons. “I’ve learned a lot the last couple of years from Nick Schilkey and I think he was a great leader off the ice and on the ice, so it’s just trying to take parts of what he’d done in the past and what I’ve done to get here and try to lead this team to a championship,” Jobst said.Ohio State head coach Steve Rohlik also understood what types of positive qualities Jobst brings to the team in many aspects.“He’s a kid that carries himself on the ice and off the ice, he’s the one that leads our culture and does the right things,” Rohlik said. “When your team looks at a player like that, everybody feeds off it.”Size has always been the concern for Jobst, who stands 5-foot-8, but Krygier said he knew Jobst would overcome any obstacles in his way.“For Mason to produce in the USHL the way he did, and the style he played and the work ethic he had, there was no doubt in my mind that he was going to be an All-American hockey player,” Krygier said.Jobst said players like future NHL Hall of Famer Martin St. Louis, current Calgary Flames wing Johnny Gaudreau, and Columbus Blue Jackets wing Cam Atkinson — all 5-foot-9 or shorter — are succeeding in ways he hopes to one day. Jobst wears the No. 26 because of St. Louis.“[St. Louis] was kind of a guy that started paving the way for smaller guys in the NHL with how hard he worked and how skilled he was,” Jobst said.Jobst and the No. 19 Buckeyes open the regular season with a pair of games on the road against a Big Ten opponent in No. 12 Wisconsin.“We’re getting right after it, playing a team that knocked us out of the Big Ten playoffs last year so I think we’re itching to get in there, and it should be a good atmosphere and a lot of fun,” Jobst said.Rohlik said Jobst is a special kind of player, and one who should only get better in this upcoming season.“As soon as you become satisfied you’re going to get passed up, and Mason’s not the kid that ever gets satisfied,” Rohlik said. read more

BBC Worldwide is upping the distribution of BBC Fi

BBC Worldwide is upping the distribution of BBC Fi

first_imgBBC Worldwide is upping the distribution of BBC First in the Netherlands after agreeing a deal with TV, internet and phone provider Caiway.The fibre operator will carry the ‘best of British drama’ channel from June 15, and it will available to its 200,000 subscribers.The fully localised Dutch version of BBC First is already available in some 6.7 million homes in the Netherlands, having launched there first via KPN in May 2015.“We are proud to add Caiway as one of the providers of BBC First in The Netherlands after its proven success on other platforms in the region,” said Simon Cottle, distribution director, Northern Europe, BBC Worldwide.“It’s great to see Dutch audiences enjoying British drama, and by adding Caiway, we are able to offer unmissable series to even more households.”BBC First offer a range of popular series including Sherlock, Luther, Silent Witness, Death in Paradise and The Durrells.The Netherlands was the first European launch market for BBC First, with a Belgian launch following a month later.Globally, the channel is also available in Australia, Hong Kong, North Africa, Malaysia, the Middle East, Singapore and South Africa.last_img read more

The Dress Code for This New Restaurant Is Your Birthday Suit

first_img Add to Queue Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Niche marketing Twin brothers in Paris left the insurance business to open a restaurant catering to nude vegans. Contributor President of The Marks Group Image credit: O’naturel | Facebook Next Article Apply Now » The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. –shares 3 min read Gene Marks 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List November 8, 2017 The Dress Code for This New Restaurant Is Your Birthday Suit If you’ve ever had the desire to eat an entire meal in public and be completely naked at the same time well…now’s your chance. Just go to Paris and make a reservation at O’naturel.Yes, that’s the actual name and at the 40-seat O’naturel, which opened its doors last week, customers are asked to leave their clothes in the cloakroom and proceed – in all their splendidness – to dine with other clothe-less patrons. The “bistronomic” menu starts around € 39 (about $45) and features vegan dishes, whitch are popular among naturists, and of course a great wine selection. This is Paris, let’s not forget.Related: Dear Entrepreneurs: Small Is Still BeautifulDon’t worry, health officials, the staff are clothed, patrons wear slippers and the seats have disposable covers.According to two reports last week here and here in Le Parisian, would-be voyeurs on the street won’t get a peep show. The establishment sports a “neutral” front, with a heavy blackout curtain and other screens covering the main windows. The entrance is designed to prevent anyone from seeing inside, even when the doors are opened. The establishment received a hearty thumbs up from members of the Association des Naturists de Paris, who were invited to be the very first diners.Related: 9 Startups Changing the Fabric of FashionThe French, being French, aren’t ruffled. In fact, residents in the restaurant’s neighborhood are mostly indifferent to its uniqueness. “When we learned what was going to be here, obviously it made us laugh. Especially since there is a nursery next door,” one resident who lives above the restaurant said. “But it does not bother me.”Even though it’s early days, things seem to be going pretty well for Mike and Stéphane Saada, the twin-brothers who own the restaurant. The Saada twins are ex-insurance industry executives and, unsurprisingly, ardent naturists. The restaurateurs are hoping to tap into the two-million strong naturist community in France. “We have already had quite a few reservations on the Internet,” they said, adding the comments coming in on their website are “very nice.”Related: 7 Steps to Defining Your Niche MarketLots of people open up restaurants and it’s no secret that many of them fail. It’s a hard and competitive business. Which is why a potential road to success is picking a demographic — whether it’s vegans, naked people or even lovers of the Golden Girls — and (of course) serving up good food. In this highly specialized world, many smart business owners I know are zeroing in on a targeted industry and becoming excellent at a particular skill to stand out and profit. So why not excellent food that caters to the community of French naturists?Oh, and the best thing about O’naturel? Well, in my opinion, it’s that no matter how high the bill is, you’ll never feel like you’ve lost your shirt.last_img read more

Marijuana Is a 794 Million Windfall for the States That Have Legalized

first_img Guest Writer Green Entrepreneur Podcast Lawmakers loath to raise taxes but eager for new revenue are increasingly open-minded about legal marijuana. August 9, 2018 Add to Queue Marijuana Is a $794 Million Windfall for the States That Have Legalized Adult Use Image credit: Hillary Kladke | Getty Images Easy Search. Quality Finds. Your partner and digital portal for the cannabis community. Each week hear inspiring stories of business owners who have taken the cannabis challenge and are now navigating the exciting but unpredictable Green Rush. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Next Article 3 min read There are several good reasons for state lawmakers to embrace legal adult-use marijuana — criminal justice reform, ending mass incarceration, respect for individual rights — but for many the most compelling reason is this number: $793.6 million.That is the estimated 2017 total of taxes and fees raked in by five states where adult-use marijuana is legal, according to a report from the National Cannabis Industry Association. The NCIA, founded in 2010, represents about 1,500 businesses in the marijuana industry across the United States.Much of the rhetoric advocating legal marijuana revolves around arguments such as cannabis being less dangerous than alcohol or the social justice issues surrounding the implementation of drug laws. Those are strong, valid arguments but when it comes to actually changing minds, it’s wise to remember that money really does change everything.Related: Education and Employment Is High in Cannabis-Friendly StatesA windfall where the law allows it.The cannabis economy offers ambitious entrepreneurs the chance to flourish in an already competitive environment, but it’s the money governments are bringing in that is really turning heads in many public offices around the country. The NCIA-reported revenue for just five states. The numbers (rounded) from each are:Washington — $441 millionColorado — $234 millionOregon — $68.6 millionAlaska — $6.1 millionNevada — $43.7 millionThat Nevada number is particularly eye-catching because the state only started regulated sales of marijuana in July 2017.For state governments, there is simply nothing else aside from a gargantuan tax increase that can generate that much additional money this fast. Many observers think the potential for a large and reliable new source of marijuana tax revenue will push more states to legalize, just as New Hampshire’s legalization of a state lottery in 1964 prompted most other states to eventually follow suit. There are currenly just six states — Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Mississippi, Nevada, and Utah — without a state lottery. Related: Jimmy Kimmel’s ‘Dr. Quinn Medicinal Marijuana Woman’ Spoof Is HilariousEstimates of potential marijuana tax revenue has energized the push for legalization in other states.This talk heated up especially in Illinois last year, with even the Chicago Tribune weighing in that legalizing marijuana could help solve the state’s intractable budget problems. Voters will get a chance to approve recreational marijuana sales in November. However, it’s just an “advisory” ballot question. State lawmakers would still need to act. But a majority “yes” vote on legal adult-use cannabis would give lawmakers on the fence the political cover they need to move forward on legalization.Late last year, the Pennsylvania auditor general also advocated legalized marijuana to solve that state’s budget crisis, conservatively estimating $200 million in new revenue.Legalizing and taxing adult-use recreational marijuana is an increasingly viable option for states. The biggest barrier, as always, is lawmakers and state executives who led these states into a budget crisis in the first place. Voters who remember the promise of those who promoted state lotteries also might be skeptical about what marijuana tax dollars can accomplish.That said, for embattled state leaders, legalizing adult-use marijuana is a path more and more are willing to take — or at least seriously consider.Follow dispensaries.com on Instagram to stay up to date on the latest cannabis news. –shares dispensaries.com Legal Marijuana Listen Nowlast_img read more

New report explores the wideranging questions on death

first_img Source:https://www.thehastingscenter.org/publications-resources/special-reports-2/what-does-dead-mean/ Are brain-dead organ donors dead? (“A Conceptual Justification for Brain Death”) by James Bernat, emeritus professor of medicine and neurology at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, upholds the longstanding view that brain death quickly leads to the disintegration of the body, regardless of medical support. But (“Brain Death: A Conclusion in Search of a Justification”) by D. Alan Shewmon, emeritus professor of pediatrics and neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, discusses several cases in which the bodies of patients pronounced brain dead did not “disintegrate” but were maintained by mechanical ventilation and tube feeding. (“DCDD Donors Are Not Dead”) by Ari Joffe, clinical professor in the department of pediatrics at the University of Alberta, argues that a subset of organ donors – those whose death is declared five minutes after the onset of pulselessness – are not dead because their condition could be reversed with medical intervention. Ethical conundrums: saving patients vs. saving organs. Potential organ donors who have undergone unexpected cardiac arrest outside of the hospital pose ethical challenges because their preferences concerning life-sustaining interventions and concerning organ donation may be unknown. When a patient’s chances of survival and recovery are extremely uncertain, first responders have a limited window of opportunity to act to preserve potentially viable organs. In some cases where organ preservation protocols were initiated after CPR failed, patients have recovered to some degree. (“Uncontrolled DCD: When Should We Stop Trying to Save the Patient and Focus on Saving the Organs?”) by Iván Ortega-Deballon, associate professor of health law and medical ethics and resuscitation at the Universidad de Alcalá in Spain, and David Rodríguez-Arias, Ramón y Cajal researcher of moral philosophy and bioethics in the philosophy department at the Universidad de Granada in Spain, examines whether current protocols prematurely consider as potential donors patients who have some chance of meaningful survival. They propose a pathway for first responders to uphold the best interests of patients even as they are being assessed and treated as potential donors. The future of organ transplantation. Two essays explore ethical questions associated with using pigs and other animals as organ donors for humans: (“The Other Animals of Transplant’s Future”) by Leslie A. Sharp, the Barbara Chamberlain and Helen Chamberlain Josefsberg ’30 chair in anthropology at Barnard College, and (“Bodies in Transition: Ethics in Xenotransplantation Research”) by Sheila Jasanoff, Pforzheimer professor of science and technology studies at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. The case of Jahi McMath. The concept of brain death was prominent in conflicts arising after McMath, an African-American teenager, was declared brain dead in a California hospital in 2013 after complications from elective surgery. Rejecting this determination, her family moved her to New Jersey, whose brain death statute includes a religious exemption and where a patient covered by this exemption can be enrolled in Medicaid to pay for long-term care. For nearly four years, McMath was kept biologically alive, until she was declared dead from cardiac arrest in New Jersey in 2018. Three essays explore the medical, ethical, and social questions that the case raised and reconsider the situation of Jahi McMath and her family in light of recent findings on the health consequences of implicit bias: (“Lessons from the Case of Jahi McMath”) by Robert D. Truog; (“The Case of Jahi McMath: A Neurologist’s View”) by D. Alan Shewmon; and (“Revisiting Death: Implicit Bias and the Case of Jahi McMath”) by Michele Goodwin, a chancellor’s professor at University of California, Irvine, and the founding director for the Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy. Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 6 2019Should death be defined in strictly biological terms — as the body’s failure to maintain integrated functioning of respiration, blood circulation, and neurological activity? Should death be declared on the basis of severe neurological injury even when biological functions remain intact? Or is it essentially a social construct that should be defined in different ways?These are among the wide-ranging questions explored in a new special report, (“Defining Death: Organ Transplantation and the Fifty-Year Legacy of the Harvard Report on Brain Death,”) published with the current issue of the Hastings Center Report. The special report is a collaboration between The Hastings Center and the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School. Editors are (Robert D. Truog), the Frances Glessner Lee professor of medical ethics, anaesthesiology & pediatrics and director of the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School; (Nancy Berlinger), a research scholar at The Hastings Center; Rachel L. Zacharias, a student at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and a former project manager and research assistant at The Hastings Center; and (Mildred Z. Solomon), president of The Hastings Center.Until the mid-twentieth century, the definition of death was straightforward: a person was pronounced dead when found to be unresponsive and without a pulse or spontaneous breathing. Two developments prompted the need for a new concept of death, culminating in the definition of brain death proposed in the Harvard report published in 1968.The first development was the invention of mechanical ventilation supported by intensive care, which made it possible to maintain breathing and blood circulation in the body of a person who would otherwise have died quickly from a brain injury that caused loss of these vital functions. The second development was organ transplantation, which “usually requires the availability of ‘living’ organs from bodies deemed to be ‘dead’,” as the (introduction) to the special report explains. “Patients determined to be dead by neurologic criteria and who have consented to organ donation . . . are the ideal source of such organs, since death is declared while the organs are being kept alive by a ventilator and a beating heart.”While the legal determination of death in all 50 states includes death by neurological criteria – the irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain – the concept of brain death remains contested, most recently by the case of Jahi McMath, who was declared dead by neurological criteria but continued to have unexpected biological development. In the new special report, leading experts in medicine, bioethics, and other fields discuss and debate areas of continuing and new controversy, including:last_img read more

Effective engagement of corporations with communities improves outcomes in sport sector

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 26 2019A new book co-written by a University of Kent sports scientist recommends corporations and organizations engage more effectively with communities – rather than taking a ‘top down’ approach – to improve relationships and outcomes in the sport sector.Such outcomes include approaches to the financial resourcing of schools and community groups, shared development of sport-based educational material, and the general promotion of sport and physical activity.Dr Geoffery Kohe, Lecturer in Sport Management and Policy in the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, makes the recommendation after research into strategic alliances forged between sports, education, social development, charity, political and corporate sector stakeholders.Related StoriesOlympus launches next-generation X Line objectives for clinical, research applicationsAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysHis book, entitled Sport, Education and Corporatisation: Spaces of connectivity, contestation and creativity (Routledge, 2019), looks at global, regional and local places where stakeholder connections are made, sport and physical activity initiatives are produced, and community action and engagement takes place.The book considers key organizations, including the International Olympic Committee, international and European football associations, the United Nations and its affiliated agencies, companies like Nike, Adidas, Coca Cola and McDonalds as well as philanthropic entities such as the Gates and Aegon Transamerica Foundation.Dr Kohe and co-author Dr Holly Collison, of Loughborough University London, argue that large multinational companies are in a powerful position to shape sports education. However, not enough is known about corporate interventions in sport and sport policy development.Alliances between commercial entities and sport for educational purposes have become increasingly normalized, and are used frequently to demonstrate a shared commitment to a ‘greater good’, the researchers argue.Dr Kohe, a member of Kent’s Sport Legacies and Communities Research Group, said: ‘Ultimately, we need more space for critical dialogue and local ownership in these partnerships and improved transparency, accountability and democracy at all levels. Organizations that lead initiatives and control resource provision have moral responsibilities and a duty of care to ensure their presence is not exploitative and agendas do not supplant existing liberties and freedoms.’ Source:http://www.kent.ac.uk/last_img read more

Epileptic patients experience ecstatic aura on stimulating brains dorsal anterior insula

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 25 2019The epileptic “aura” is a subjective phenomenon that sometimes precedes the visible clinical features of a seizure. Investigators tested three epileptic patients prior to potential surgery to try to determine where their seizures originate. They observed that these patients reported an ecstatic aura only when the dorsal anterior insula of the brain was stimulated. Their findings in the journal Brain Stimulation, published by Elsevier, provide additional support of a major role played by the dorsal anterior insula in ecstatic experiences.Throughout history some people have experienced states of ecstasy. In these moments they describe a blissful altered consciousness with a sense of hyper-reality, a hyper awareness of the present moment, and a feeling of union with the Universe. Attaining or producing these states is a key component of many religious traditions.”An important modern question is whether these states arise from activity in specific brain regions and if so, where,” explained lead investigator Fabrice Bartolomei, MD, PhD, Aix-Marseille University, INSERM, INS, Institute of Neuroscience Systems, and APHM, Timone Hospital, Clinical Neurophysiology and Epileptology Department, Marseille, France. “A better understanding of the network mechanisms underlying this fascinating subjective experience may help to unravel some mysteries of human consciousness. The insula, a lobe in the brain behind the ears that is insulated because it is hidden deep in the brain, has recently been proposed to be a key region to elicit these symptoms.”Some patients with epilepsy experience a type of aura referred to as “ecstatic.” Patients use terms like “hyper-reality,” “clarity,” “evidence,” “certainty,” “understanding,” “insight,” “enlightenment,” or “epiphany” to describe this state. The Russian writer Fyodor Dostoevsky, who experienced such seizures himself, gave a famous description in his novel The Idiot, in which one of his characters reports feeling “overflowing with unbounded joy and rapture, ecstatic devotion, and completest life.”Investigators describe three patients with refractory focal epilepsy, who had probes inserted into their brains to try to determine where their seizures originated, potentially to remove those regions surgically and cure their disease. They studied functional connectivity changes in several brain areas during the induction of ecstatic auras by direct electrical stimulation of the dorsal anterior insular cortex in patients implanted with intracerebral electrodes (stereotactic-EEG, SEEG) during their pre-surgical evaluation. These patients were selected on the basis of the occurrence of ecstatic symptoms triggered by direct intracerebral electrical stimulation of the antero-dorsal part of the insula.Related StoriesRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionStudy offers clues about how to prevent brain inflammation in Alzheimer’sElectrical stimulation was performed in a bipolar fashion to each contact in the gray matter during a three-second period to map functional cortices and trigger habitual seizures. One stimulation inducing ecstatic changes in each patient was analyzed. Functional connectivity analysis was performed by measuring interdependencies between SEEG signals before and after stimulations.Each patient reported an ecstatic aura only when the dorsal anterior insula was stimulated. Investigators measured brain wave activity (EEG) during periods of ecstasy and found that the anterior insula was serving as a critical node or hub in the network activity, suggesting that in some way this region can produce or release this feeling. The field of brain stimulation is still in its infancy. While these patients had to have wires inserted into their brains in order to produce ecstasy, in the future it may be possible to stimulate this spot non-invasively.”Fabrice Bartolomei, MD, PhD, Aix-Marseille University “Science routinely progresses through hypothesis-driven research conducted by large teams of researchers,” added Mark George, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Brain Stimulation. “However, accidental ‘discoveries’ are also important. These serendipitous observations can help us understand the world around us, particularly the world within our skulls, the human brain. Perhaps in the near future we can use noninvasive brain stimulation methods to stimulate this region and determine if it truly is the seat of ecstasy.Dr. George cautions that, while this is an important clue for the field, it is important to remember that these results were observed in patients with epilepsy, so we do not yet know if this effect is generalizable to people without epilepsy. Understanding the brain networks involved in consciousness and altered states is important for many reasons, some therapeutic and others philosophical and cultural. Source:ElsevierJournal reference:Bartolomei, F. et al. (2019) The role of the dorsal anterior insula in ecstatic sensation revealed by direct electrical brain stimulation. Brain Stimulation. doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2019.06.005last_img read more

LA to become first in US to install subway body scanners

first_img Citation: LA to become first in US to install subway body scanners (2018, August 14) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-la-subway-body-scanners.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Body scanners being piloted in Los Angeles subway system In this Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018 file photo ThruVision suicide vest-detection technology reveals an suspicious object on a man, at left, during a Transportation Security Administration demonstration in New York’s Penn Station. Los Angeles is poised to have the first mass transit system in the U.S. with body scanners that screen passengers for weapons and explosives. Officials from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Transportation Security Administration have scheduled a Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, news conference. The TSA has been working on the experimental devices, known as standoff explosive detection units, since 2004 with transit agencies. They hadn’t been deployed permanently at any transit hub. (AP Photo/Richard Drew,File)center_img © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Transportation Security Administration had been testing several different types of body scanners for about a year.The scanners that are being deployed are portable, and project waves to do a full-body screening of passengers walking through a station without slowing them down.The machines, which scan for metallic and non-metallic objects on a person’s body, can detect suspicious items from 30 feet (9 meters) away and have the capability of scanning more than 2,000 passengers per hour, said Brian Haas, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.The TSA tested body scanners in New York’s Penn Station in February and has also conducted tests at Union Station in Washington, D.C., and at a New Jersey Transit station during the 2014 Super Bowl.In December, a Bangladeshi immigrant injured himself by setting off a crude pipe bomb strapped to his chest in a subway passageway near Times Square in New York City.Metro has previously tested several different types of body scanners, including airport-style screening systems where passengers walk through a scanner. The pilot program was meant to evaluate the accuracy and capacity of the portable machines.About 150,000 passengers ride on Metro’s Red Line daily and the subway system counted more than 112 million rides last year. The Los Angeles subway system will become the first in the U.S. to install body scanners that screen passengers for weapons and explosives, officials said Tuesday.last_img read more

Facebook stops requiring arbitration of sexual harassment claims

first_img © 2018 AFP Google reforms sexual misconduct rules Citation: Facebook stops requiring arbitration of sexual harassment claims (2018, November 10) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-facebook-sexual-misconduct.html Explore further The change of workplace rules at the world’s leading social network will allow complaints of such improprieties to be aired openly in court.”Today, we are publishing our updated Workplace Relationships policy and amending our arbitration agreements to make arbitration a choice rather than a requirement in sexual harassment claims,” Facebook corporate media relations director Anthony Harrison told AFP.”Sexual harassment is something that we take very seriously and there is no place for it at Facebook.”The Silicon Valley-based internet firm’s policy about workers dating one another was also modified to require executives of director level or higher to tell the human resources department when they are dating another employee at the company.Google on Thursday outlined changes to its handling of sexual misconduct complaints, hoping to calm outrage that triggered a worldwide walkout of workers last week.Arbitration of harassment claims at Google will be optional instead of obligatory, according to chief executive Sundar Pichai, a move that could end anonymous settlements that fail to identify those accused of harassment.”Google has never required confidentiality in the arbitration process and it still may be the best path for a number of reasons (e.g. personal privacy, predictability of process), but, we recognize that the choice should be up to you,” Pichai said in a memo shared with AFP.Pichai promised that Google will be more transparent with how concerns are handled, and provide better support and care to those who raise such issues with the company.A section of an internal “Investigations Report” will show numbers of substantiated sexual harassment concerns as well as trends and disciplinary actions, according to the California-based company.He also said Google is consolidating the complaint system and that the process for handling concerns will include providing support personnel and counselors.Google will update its mandatory sexual harassment training, and require it annually instead of every two years as had been the case.center_img Facebook on Friday said it will no longer require employees to resolve sexual harassment claims via arbitration, mirroring a move by Google. A change of Facebook workplace rules will allow sexual harassment compalints to be aired openly in court This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Amazon tries to prove its not a Dickensian workhouse opinion

first_img Tech News 04 Jul 2019 Amazon exec fires back at John Oliver after HBO segment on warehouses: ‘He is wrong’ You can identify companies’ sore spots by what gets them angry.   Last week, the executive in charge of Amazon.com Inc’s logistics operation tweeted a rebuttal to a television show. Comedian John Oliver had devoted one of his trademark scathing and hilarious HBO segments to the working conditions in warehouses that handle e-commerce orders. Amazon was not the only company pilloried, but it was the most prominent.   “I am proud of our team and to suggest they would work in an environment like the one portrayed is insulting,” Dave Clark, senior vice-president of operations for Amazon, tweeted to Oliver’s TV series.  Clark last year also punched back against criticisms from Bernie Sanders, the US senator and presidential candidate, who had repeatedly taken Amazon to task for what he said were low wages and poor treatment of warehouse workers. Soon afterward, Amazon essentially capitulated to Sanders by announcing it would increase the minimum wage for its US workers to US$15 (RM62) an hour.   Tech News 10 Jul 2019 Amazon workers in Minnesota plan six-hour strike during Prime Day event Related News {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} World 27 Jun 2019 Bernie Sanders seeks U.S. voters on live-streaming gaming site Related News Nothing happens by accident, not even tweets. It’s clear from Amazon’s public relations efforts that it is sensitive about the perception that the company’s warehouses – where a material portion of Amazon’s more than 630,000 full- and part-time employees work – are Dickensian sweatshops that trap people in low-wage jobs until they can be replaced by robots.  This perception is not new, but there’s a sharper edge now to Amazon’s refutations of these claims. Amazon also seems anxious at the mere idea floated by outsiders that its cashier-less technology for retail stores might spread beyond its experimental Go convenience stores.   That is important context for Amazon’s announcement on Thursday that it plans to spend more than US$700mil (RM2.87bil) over the next few years to train its US employees to move into more highly skilled jobs inside or outside of Amazon.  The company already offers employee-advancement programmes such as college tuition reimbursement, as do many other businesses. Amazon’s newly disclosed training initiatives aren’t limited to warehouse workers and have multiple elements. Non-technical Amazon workers can learn software engineering or information-technology support skills, technical ones can receive on-site training in more advanced software, and Amazon pledged to expand its existing training certification programme for warehouse workers to get qualified for in-demand fields such as nursing.  Of course, it remains to be seen how useful these new or expanding training programmes will be, but it’s both a good thing to do and a pragmatic step. As the labour market tightens in the US, it’s sensible for companies to sweeten pay, benefits and perks to attract new employees and keep them from leaving. (Full disclosure: One of my family members works for a labour union that advocates for higher wages and other employee benefits.)  It’s also useful for tackling that sweatshop perception, which gets more attention as Amazon’s heft and profile grow. The company’s stock market value is hovering again near that symbolic US$1tril (RM4.11tril) level. Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s founder and chief executive officer, is the wealthiest person in the world thanks largely to his holdings of Amazon stock.  And Amazon is unique among US technology superpowers in its reliance on a large number of blue-collar workers. The median annual total compensation for Amazon’s full-time US workers last year was nearly US$35,100 (RM144,348), which reflected two months of the minimum wage increase. The median wage of one of the company’s peers, Google parent company Alphabet Inc, was about US$247,000 (RM1.01mil).(1)  There are other things Amazon gets mad about now. Amazon is punchy at claims from some politicians that it doesn’t pay its fair share in taxes, or that it’s a muscular corporate giant swallowing America’s retail industry. It’s not clear that Amazon has changed how it behaves in reaction to those types of criticisms. But when it comes to the perception of Amazon as a sweatshop, the company’s rebuttals are more than just words.   (1) The Alphabet and Amazon figures are not comparable. Amazon singled out a pay figure for full-time US workers, for example, while Alphabet’s pay number is global. Amazon says the annualised median total compensation of all its employees was less than US$29,000 (RM119,262) last year. – Bloomberg(Shira Ovide is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. She previously was a reporter for the Wall Street Journal.) It’s clear from Amazon’s public relations efforts that it is sensitive about the perception that the company’s warehouses – where a material portion of Amazon’s more than 630,000 full- and part-time employees work – are Dickensian sweatshops that trap people in low-wage jobs until they can be replaced by robots. — AFPlast_img read more

Kolkata Metro passenger dies as train starts moving with his hand stuck

first_img Indo-Asian News Service July 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 23:14 IST Eyewitnesses said victim lay in tunnel for quite some time before security personnel ran and removed him | Photo from Twitter for representationHIGHLIGHTSEyewitnesses said the victim – a middle-aged man – tried to board the Kavi Subhas-bound trainAfter the train had moved some distance, the passenger fell down in the tunnelThe victim was taken to SSKM hospital where he was declared brought deadA passenger on the Kolkata Metro railway died a horrific death after the train started moving with his hand stuck between the doors and his body hanging outside on Saturday.Eyewitnesses said the victim — a middle-aged man — tried to board the Kavi Subhas-bound train around 6.40 p.m. at Park Street station, but could not get in fully due to a heavy rush of passengers.He had only got his hand inside the compartment when the doors closed, and his hand got stuck. To the horror of onlookers, the train started moving towards Maidan station with the man’s body hanging outside.After the train had moved some distance, he fell down in the tunnel.A passenger Sudip Roy said soon after the train started moving towards Maidan there was a burning smell and the train came to a halt.Eyewitnesses said the victim lay in the tunnel for quite some time before security personnel ran and removed him.The victim was taken to SSKM hospital where he was declared brought dead.A Kolkata Metro spokesperson described the incident as “unfortunate” and said a three-member inquiry committee has been formed. The committee will view the CCTV footage and the circumstances leading to the incident.Also Read | Man commits suicide by jumping in front of metro at Civil Lines Metro Station, body severedAlso Read | Muslims fear displacement from Jama Masjid area as Agra Metro project moves forwardAlso Watch | Unmanned Magenta line Metro train collides with wall during test run in DelhiFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byMohak Gupta Tags :Follow KolkataFollow Kolkata Metro Kolkata Metro passenger dies as train starts moving with his hand stuck between doorsThe passemger only got his hand inside the compartment when the doors closed, and his hand got stuck.advertisement Nextlast_img read more