Tag: 上海贵族宝贝

Former Michigan Star Taylor Lewan Trolls Former Michigan State Star Jack Conklin On Instagram

first_imgJack Conklin's Michigan State jersey seen in the Tennessee Titans locker room.Instagram/Taylor LewanMichigan State has owned Michigan on the gridiron in recent history, winning seven of the last eight matchups between the two programs. But one prominent former Wolverine is tired of living in the past, and Wednesday he had a little fun at the expense of his new Tennessee Titans teammate – a former Spartan.Former Michigan offensive tackle Taylor Lewan, who was drafted 11th overall back in 2014, apparently wasn’t a fan of what former Michigan State offensive tackle Jack Conklin, who was drafted eighth overall this year, had hanging in his locker room. Lewan, after seeing Conklin’s Spartans jersey, playfully told him to “grow up” on Instagram. He added a “Go Blue” for fun too. Lewan and Conklin are both expected to play prominent roles for the Titans this year.last_img read more

The Silly Way Coaches Wins Are Counted

The Silly Way Coaches Wins Are Counted

If his Spurs win Wednesday, Gregg Popovich will reach a coaching milestone: 1,150 career wins. Or, if you look at it another (admittedly kookier) way, he could record his 23,787th win.Popovich reached a different sort of milestone Monday: his 1,000th career regular-season win as head coach. Although several NBA players, including LeBron James, congratulated him on the achievement, Pop’s reaction was subdued. Perhaps that’s because he remembers that he really won his 1,000th game more than two years ago — on Jan. 25, 2013, against Dallas. That night, he won his 882nd regular-season game, to go with 118 playoff wins to that point — although coverage of the game suggests that few did the arithmetic at the time. (An ill Popovich wasn’t even there to celebrate, although the game still counts in his ledger because he remained the team’s head coach.)The standard across most North American professional team sports is to omit playoff accomplishments from career totals even though postseason performance is much more important than regular-season feats for winning titles.1College stats typically include postseason numbers. The typical reason given for doing this with player stats is that players can’t choose their teammates. Charles Barkley isn’t any less great for not winning a title — it says more about his teams. It’s not Ernie Banks‘s fault that he didn’t make the playoffs, so he shouldn’t fall behind Gary Sheffield on the career home-run list. Or so the thinking goes.Even if that argument holds for players, though, it’s a lot shakier for coaches. The whole notion of counting their wins, and celebrating when that count reaches a nice round number, implicitly credits the coaches for the sum of their players’ accomplishments (however flawed that idea is; in Popovich’s case, it does seem like he deserves quite a bit of credit). If coaches get the credit for regular-season wins, then surely they should also get credit for the postseason wins those regular-season wins make possible. By that math, Popovich falls a bit further behind Phil Jackson and Pat Riley, the two other most successful coaches in modern NBA history; each has more playoff wins than Popovich’s 149, earned along the way to five titles.If we’ve convinced you that playoff wins should count toward a coach’s career total, then perhaps you’ll walk with us a little further down this plank. Surely playoff wins shouldn’t only count alongside regular-season wins but should count more than them. Most NBA executives, coaches and players would agree — and perhaps few would agree more than Popovich, whose reputed coaching style is to use the first half of the regular season to test lineups and try out new players, rather than, say, to win as many games as possible.So just how much more should a playoff win count? A whole lot more, by our calculations. For every playoff game since 1984, we calculated how much that game’s outcome swung the teams’ chances of winning the title, relative to an average regular-season game.2Similar to what we did for our post about Tom Brady’s accomplishments, we used the number of teams in the NBA each season, the number of playoff teams and the length of the schedule to determine how much the average regular-season game changed an average team’s championship probability. For instance, in 2013-14, there were 30 NBA teams, so each started with a 1-in-30 — or 3.3 percent — chance of winning the title. After the regular season, 16 teams’ chances rose to 1-in-16 (6.3 percent) and 14 teams’ odds fell to zero. That means the average NBA game last season moved a team’s championship needle either up or down by just 0.04 percentage points. So, for instance, Game 3 of last June’s NBA Finals counted as much as about 487 regular-season games in terms of championship impact, while Game 4 of Miami’s sweep of Charlotte was worth just 15 regular-season games.Add up the regular-season value of Popovich’s playoff wins, and you’ll find that they were worth 22,786 regular-season wins — or nearly 23 times as much as the sum total of his 1,000 regular-season wins. That’s pretty impressive, but he and his players have some work to do to catch Jackson and Riley, who top all coaches whose first playoff appearance was in or after the 1984 postseason. We don’t really mean that Popovich has won 23,786 regular-season games. It would be just as accurate to say that in the regular season, he has won 6.5 playoff games since his average playoff win counted for about 150 regular-season wins. A playoff win isn’t the same as a regular-season win, but that’s not a good enough reason not to include them when summing and assessing a coach’s accomplishments. These calculations show just how much of a coach’s value comes after his wins stop counting. The regular-season wins reflect a coach’s longevity. (“The time, that’s the most important element,” Popovich said Monday. “You have to be around for a while, I guess.”) The playoff wins reflect his true value — and that of his players. Phil Jackson1,15545,59246,747 Pat Riley1,21031,43032,640 Chuck Daly63813,76114,399 George Karl1,1319,09410,225 COACHREGULARSEASON WINSPLAYOFF WINS(REG SEASONEQUIVALENT)TOTAL Doc Rivers67810,42511,103 Erik Spoelstra33612,69213,028 Rick Adelman1,0429,68110,723 Gregg Popovich1,00022,78623,786 Rudy Tomjanovich52710,34510,872 read more

Ohio State mens womens cross country teams aim for Big Ten championship

The Ohio State men’s and women’s cross country teams both finished in the top half of the field at the Notre Dame Invitational on Friday. Running in South Bend, Ind., the men placed 12th out of 26 teams in the 8K race and the women took 13th place in a 28-team field 5K race on Sept. 30. While both team’s coaches said they are happy with their teams’ performances, they believe the results could have been better. The men, led by junior Donny Roys, who finished 24th with a time of 24:44, saw their top runner, senior Jake Edwards, not finish. Edwards had a hamstring spasm and dropped around the four-mile mark of a five-mile race. “We were really high up there through three miles. And then Jake dropped out. That’s a 70, 75-point swing,” men’s coach Robert Gary said. “You know, I’m a little disappointed, but it shows that we’re a pretty solid team.” The men finished with a total score of 326, ahead of Penn State who had 343 points in 14th place. When Edwards dropped out, he was in the top 30 of 175 runners. OSU’s fifth runner, senior Adam Green, ran a 25:28 and finished 96th. Senior Jordan Jennewine finished first for the women in 37th with a 17:42. The women had a total score of 366, behind Big Ten foe Penn State who finished in fourth place. Women’s assistant coach Chris Neal said he thought the team ran well at the beginning of the race but didn’t have a strong second mile. “The big thing for us was getting out fast and I think through the mile, we had six girls in the top forty. After that we kind of fell apart,” Neal said. “We just have to clean up the middle of our effort and we’ll be where we want to be.” Both teams were running against highly ranked competition. The No.25-ranked men’s team ran against seven top-30 opponents, including No. 3 Stanford and No. 10 Florida State. The women competed against six top-30 teams. The Big Ten championship meet on Oct. 30 is now less than a month away. Jennewine, the women’s number one runner, said her team needs to run well as a pack. “I’d say as a team our strength has been that we can all bunch together and finish close with a short spread,” Jennewine said. “I think we need to just move the pack up.” A top-three finish is in sight for both teams at the Big Ten championship meet. “I think Wisconsin and Indiana are probably a step ahead of the rest of the conference,” Gary said. “I think there are probably three or four schools, Minnesota, Penn State, who we beat today, and probably Illinois. I think those three teams plus ourselves are fighting for third place.” Neal said Michigan is the team to beat in the women’s conference, but believes a top-three finish is in reach for the Buckeyes. “I think with Penn State, us, Minnesota and Iowa, it’s just going to be one of those years where on a good day you can be third but on a bad day you’re sitting in eighth,” Neal said. Both teams are confident heading into the thick of the season. “I think we’re right on track to get into the top three at the Big Ten championships,” Roys said of the men. “We’re stronger than last year so we’re getting out. I think we’re right on pace right now.” Jennewine likes how her team is improving as the season goes on. “I think we’re definitely moving forward and getting better each week,” she said. The men and women will take a week off from competition and then travel to Wisconsin for the Wisconsin Adidas Invitational on Oct. 14. read more

Di Francesco reveals what Roma need to improve on for next

Di Francesco reveals what Roma need to improve on for next

first_imgAS Roma manager Eusebio Di Francesco has revealed that they must improve up front if they are to mount a challenge for the Serie A title next seasonThe Giallorossi finished their league campaign with a narrow 1-0 win against Sassuolo on Sunday night with a Gianluca Pegolo own goal proving to be the difference between the two sides.Roma has finished in a respectable third place in the Serie A table for this term, but they have ended up 10 points off last season’s total at 77 points.While pleased with the defensive work of his side this campaign, Di Francesco is under no doubt that Roma must effective in front of goal.“We’ve got the second-best defence in the league, but we need to improve in front of goal. We’re too far off the teams who finished ahead of us. We’ve created a lot of chances this season but we could have done better to finish them off,” the Italian told the club website.Maurizio Sarri, JuventusMaurizio Sarri satisfied despite Juventus’ draw at Fiorentina Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Maurizio Sarri was satisfied with Juventus’ performance on Saturday afternoon after finishing a tough game at Fiorentina 0-0.Since replacing the departed Wojciech Szczesny at the beginning of the season, Alisson has greatly impressed in goal for the capital club and is widely expected to be targeted by the likes of Real Madrid and Liverpool this summer.“I haven’t been told anything about this. Obviously, the transfer market can throw up all sorts of situations, but my wish is that he remains here,” said Di Francesco.The Roma boss’ sole focus is on reducing the gap up front with the club having ended up 18 points behind champions Juventus with second place Napoli 14 points ahead.“We want to reduce the gap on the sides that finished in front of us. We want to improve and our performances are the way to show that. We will work hard to get better,” added Di Francesco.last_img read more

Wijnaldum sees room for improvement despite win

Wijnaldum sees room for improvement despite win

first_imgGeorginio Wijnaldum has praised Liverpool’s 4-0 win at Bournemouth but affirmed there is still room for improvement in their games away from home.Jürgen Klopp’s side clearly dominated and managed the game at the Vitality Stadium as they pummelled the Cherries with three second-half goals.Mohamed Salah bagged a hat-trick – with the other a Steve Cook own goal – to secure a result that lifted the Reds a point ahead of Manchester City at the top of the table.However, Dutch midfielder Wijnaldum insisted Liverpool, who are now top of the Premier League table could have done better in the game.Top 5 Premier League players to watch for next weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Premier League’s Top 5 players to watch this weekend.After…“It would have been complete if we’d done the first half much better,” the midfielder told Liverpoolfc.com after the final whistle.“But in the second half we did what we usually do with the counter-press; that’s how we scored the second goal, when Mo scored. That’s the game we want to play – a high press when we lose the ball, counter-press to create chances, and also play to create chances. That went well in the second half.“It was a good game but if you want the perfect game, we had to play a better first half.”last_img read more

Report Mario Balotelli could make an unexpected Premier League return

Report Mario Balotelli could make an unexpected Premier League return

first_imgNewcastle are reportedly considering making an approach for Mario Balotelli for this month’s transfer windowRafael Benitez’s side have claimed the second-fewest goals in the Premier League with just 15 from 21 games and currently sit two points above the relegation zone in 15th-place.Therefore, the Daily Mirror claims that Newcastle are eyeing up an approach for Balotelli in order to add some badly needed firepower to the squad.The Italian striker’s stay at OGC Nice appears to be coming to an end after manager Patrick Vieira gave him an additional few days off to decide his future.“I have given Mario a few extra days off to think about his future and what he wants to do,” Vieira said.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“He’s under contract here and everything is possible, if we can come to a common agreement who knows.”After a prolific two seasons at the Allianz Riviera, Balotelli is yet to find the net in all of his 10 Ligue 1 appearances this term following a failed summer move to Marseille.Now it’s understood that Vieira and Nice will allow Balotelli, who will be out of contract in June, to leave for Newcastle if they decide to make an approach.The 28-year-old previously played in the Premier League for Manchester City and Liverpool.last_img read more

Martial hoping for an extended Solskjaer stay

Martial hoping for an extended Solskjaer stay

first_imgAnthony Martial has tipped Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to retain the managerial position at Manchester United on a permanent basis.The French midfielder revealed the entire squad is enjoying the reign of the Norwegian boss ahead of their clash with PSG.Martial scored a superb solo goal in United’s 3-0 win over Fulham on Saturday to enter the top four and further extend the unbeaten run under the 45-year-old to 11 games.French connexion ⚡️⚡️⚡️ pic.twitter.com/6q6N13MBFS— Anthony Martial (@AnthonyMartial) December 22, 2018“Well, obviously things are going really well at the moment. We’re really happy to have him here,” the France forward told a news conference ahead of Tuesday’s mouth-watering Champions League showdown against Paris Saint-Germain.“Sure, I hope we can continue with him. The final decision isn’t down to us but certainly, we’re happy he’s here at the moment.”“We’ve got a coach who’s got different intentions, a different approach,” Martial disclosed via FourFourTwo. “We’re trying to do what he wants us to do.“When our new coach came in he had a lot of confidence and a lot of determination. That’s really a boost to us.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“He had a lot of confidence in us and we’re trying to pay him back in kind.“He’s asking me to attack more, that’s my job after all – to make the difference, as it were, to be more decisive“Things are working out well for the other attackers as well. I hope we can continue to be as effective and efficient.”.@AnthonyMartial: “Obviously things are going really well at the moment so we’re happy to have him [Ole] here with us.” #MUFC pic.twitter.com/5pELklKcg0— Manchester United (@ManUtd) February 11, 2019However, Solskjaer feels that there is still room for improvement when it comes to Martial’s finishing.“He’s often said that to me and even previous managers have said that to me,” he added.“I think if I do manage to do that [and] get beyond the defence then I will score more goals.”last_img read more

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AT HOWARD UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AT HOWARD UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

first_imgTHE PRESIDENT:  Thank you!  Hello, Howard!  (Applause.)  H-U! AUDIENCE:  You know! THE PRESIDENT:  H-U! AUDIENCE:  You know! THE PRESIDENT:  (Laughter.)  Thank you so much, everybody.  Please, please, have a seat.  Oh, I feel important now.  Got a degree from Howard.  Cicely Tyson said something nice about me.  (Laughter.)  AUDIENCE MEMBER:  I love you, President! THE PRESIDENT:  I love you back.  To President Frederick, the Board of Trustees, faculty and staff, fellow recipients of honorary degrees, thank you for the honor of spending this day with you.  And congratulations to the Class of 2016!  (Applause.)  Four years ago, back when you were just freshmen, I understand many of you came by my house the night I was reelected.  (Laughter.)  So I decided to return the favor and come by yours. To the parents, the grandparents, aunts, uncles, brothers, sisters, all the family and friends who stood by this class, cheered them on, helped them get here today — this is your day, as well.  Let’s give them a big round of applause, as well.  (Applause.) I’m not trying to stir up any rivalries here; I just want to see who’s in the house.  We got Quad?  (Applause.)  Annex.  (Applause.)  Drew.  Carver.  Slow.  Towers.  And Meridian.  (Applause.)  Rest in peace, Meridian.  (Laughter.)  Rest in peace. I know you’re all excited today.  You might be a little tired, as well.  Some of you were up all night making sure your credits were in order.  (Laughter.)  Some of you stayed up too late, ended up at HoChi at 2:00 a.m.  (Laughter.)  Got some mambo sauce on your fingers.  (Laughter.)  But you got here.  And you’ve all worked hard to reach this day.  You’ve shuttled between challenging classes and Greek life.  You’ve led clubs, played an instrument or a sport.  You volunteered, you interned.  You held down one, two, maybe three jobs.  You’ve made lifelong friends and discovered exactly what you’re made of.  The “Howard Hustle” has strengthened your sense of purpose and ambition.  Which means you’re part of a long line of Howard graduates.  Some are on this stage today.  Some are in the audience.  That spirit of achievement and special responsibility has defined this campus ever since the Freedman’s Bureau established Howard just four years after the Emancipation Proclamation; just two years after the Civil War came to an end.  They created this university with a vision — a vision of uplift; a vision for an America where our fates would be determined not by our race, gender, religion or creed, but where we would be free — in every sense — to pursue our individual and collective dreams. It is that spirit that’s made Howard a centerpiece of African-American intellectual life and a central part of our larger American story.  This institution has been the home of many firsts:  The first black Nobel Peace Prize winner.  The first black Supreme Court justice.  But its mission has been to ensure those firsts were not the last.  Countless scholars, professionals, artists, and leaders from every field received their training here.  The generations of men and women who walked through this yard helped reform our government, cure disease, grow a black middle class, advance civil rights, shape our culture.  The seeds of change — for all Americans — were sown here.  And that’s what I want to talk about today. As I was preparing these remarks, I realized that when I was first elected President, most of you — the Class of 2016 — were just starting high school.  Today, you’re graduating college.  I used to joke about being old.  Now I realize I’m old.  (Laughter.)  It’s not a joke anymore.  (Laughter.) But seeing all of you here gives me some perspective.  It makes me reflect on the changes that I’ve seen over my own lifetime.  So let me begin with what may sound like a controversial statement — a hot take. Given the current state of our political rhetoric and debate, let me say something that may be controversial, and that is this:  America is a better place today than it was when I graduated from college.  (Applause.)  Let me repeat:  America is by almost every measure better than it was when I graduated from college.  It also happens to be better off than when I took office — (laughter) — but that’s a longer story.  (Applause.)  That’s a different discussion for another speech.  But think about it.  I graduated in 1983.  New York City, America’s largest city, where I lived at the time, had endured a decade marked by crime and deterioration and near bankruptcy.  And many cities were in similar shape.  Our nation had gone through years of economic stagnation, the stranglehold of foreign oil, a recession where unemployment nearly scraped 11 percent.  The auto industry was getting its clock cleaned by foreign competition.  And don’t even get me started on the clothes and the hairstyles.  I’ve tried to eliminate all photos of me from this period.  I thought I looked good.  (Laughter.)  I was wrong.  Since that year — since the year I graduated — the poverty rate is down.  Americans with college degrees, that rate is up.  Crime rates are down.  America’s cities have undergone a renaissance.  There are more women in the workforce.  They’re earning more money.  We’ve cut teen pregnancy in half.  We’ve slashed the African American dropout rate by almost 60 percent, and all of you have a computer in your pocket that gives you the world at the touch of a button.  In 1983, I was part of fewer than 10 percent of African Americans who graduated with a bachelor’s degree.  Today, you’re part of the more than 20 percent who will.  And more than half of blacks say we’re better off than our parents were at our age — and that our kids will be better off, too. So America is better.  And the world is better, too.  A wall came down in Berlin.  An Iron Curtain was torn asunder.  The obscenity of apartheid came to an end.  A young generation in Belfast and London have grown up without ever having to think about IRA bombings.  In just the past 16 years, we’ve come from a world without marriage equality to one where it’s a reality in nearly two dozen countries.  Around the world, more people live in democracies.  We’ve lifted more than 1 billion people from extreme poverty.  We’ve cut the child mortality rate worldwide by more than half.  America is better.  The world is better.  And stay with me now — race relations are better since I graduated.  That’s the truth.  No, my election did not create a post-racial society.  I don’t know who was propagating that notion.  That was not mine.    But the election itself — and the subsequent one — because the first one, folks might have made a mistake.  (Laughter.)  The second one, they knew what they were getting.  The election itself was just one indicator of how attitudes had changed.  In my inaugural address, I remarked that just 60 years earlier, my father might not have been served in a D.C. restaurant — at least not certain of them.  There were no black CEOs of Fortune 500 companies.  Very few black judges.  Shoot, as Larry Wilmore pointed out last week, a lot of folks didn’t even think blacks had the tools to be a quarterback.  Today, former Bull Michael Jordan isn’t just the greatest basketball player of all time — he owns the team.  (Laughter.)  When I was graduating, the main black hero on TV was Mr. T.  (Laughter.)  Rap and hip hop were counterculture, underground.  Now, Shonda Rhimes owns Thursday night, and Beyoncé runs the world.  (Laughter.)  We’re no longer only entertainers, we’re producers, studio executives.  No longer small business owners — we’re CEOs, we’re mayors, representatives, Presidents of the United States.  (Applause.) I am not saying gaps do not persist.  Obviously, they do.  Racism persists.  Inequality persists.  Don’t worry — I’m going to get to that.  But I wanted to start, Class of 2016, by opening your eyes to the moment that you are in.  If you had to choose one moment in history in which you could be born, and you didn’t know ahead of time who you were going to be — what nationality, what gender, what race, whether you’d be rich or poor, gay or straight, what faith you’d be born into — you wouldn’t choose 100 years ago.  You wouldn’t choose the fifties, or the sixties, or the seventies.  You’d choose right now.  If you had to choose a time to be, in the words of Lorraine Hansberry, “young, gifted, and black” in America, you would choose right now.  (Applause.) I tell you all this because it’s important to note progress.  Because to deny how far we’ve come would do a disservice to the cause of justice, to the legions of foot soldiers; to not only the incredibly accomplished individuals who have already been mentioned, but your mothers and your dads, and grandparents and great grandparents, who marched and toiled and suffered and overcame to make this day possible.  I tell you this not to lull you into complacency, but to spur you into action — because there’s still so much more work to do, so many more miles to travel.  And America needs you to gladly, happily take up that work.  You all have some work to do.  So enjoy the party, because you’re going to be busy.  (Laughter.)  Yes, our economy has recovered from crisis stronger than almost any other in the world.  But there are folks of all races who are still hurting — who still can’t find work that pays enough to keep the lights on, who still can’t save for retirement.  We’ve still got a big racial gap in economic opportunity.  The overall unemployment rate is 5 percent, but the Black unemployment rate is almost nine.  We’ve still got an achievement gap when black boys and girls graduate high school and college at lower rates than white boys and white girls.  Harriet Tubman may be going on the twenty, but we’ve still got a gender gap when a black woman working full-time still earns just 66 percent of what a white man gets paid.  (Applause.)  We’ve got a justice gap when too many Black boys and girls pass through a pipeline from underfunded schools to overcrowded jails.  This is one area where things have gotten worse.  When I was in college, about half a million people in America were behind bars.  Today, there are about 2.2 million.  Black men are about six times likelier to be in prison right now than white men.  Around the world, we’ve still got challenges to solve that threaten everybody in the 21st century — old scourges like disease and conflict, but also new challenges, from terrorism and climate change.  So make no mistake, Class of 2016 — you’ve got plenty of work to do.  But as complicated and sometimes intractable as these challenges may seem, the truth is that your generation is better positioned than any before you to meet those challenges, to flip the script.  Now, how you do that, how you meet these challenges, how you bring about change will ultimately be up to you.  My generation, like all generations, is too confined by our own experience, too invested in our own biases, too stuck in our ways to provide much of the new thinking that will be required.  But us old-heads have learned a few things that might be useful in your journey.  So with the rest of my time, I’d like to offer some suggestions for how young leaders like you can fulfill your destiny and shape our collective future — bend it in the direction of justice and equality and freedom. First of all — and this should not be a problem for this group — be confident in your heritage.  (Applause.)  Be confident in your Blackness.  One of the great changes that’s occurred in our country since I was your age is the realization there’s no one way to be black.  Take it from somebody who’s seen both sides of debate about whether I’m black enough.  (Laughter.)  In the past couple months, I’ve had lunch with the Queen of England and hosted Kendrick Lamar in the Oval Office.  There’s no straitjacket, there’s no constraints, there’s no litmus test for authenticity.  Look at Howard.  One thing most folks don’t know about Howard is how diverse it is.  When you arrived here, some of you were like, oh, they’ve got black people in Iowa?  (Laughter.)  But it’s true — this class comes from big cities and rural communities, and some of you crossed oceans to study here.  You shatter stereotypes.  Some of you come from a long line of Bison.  Some of you are the first in your family to graduate from college.  (Applause.)  You all talk different, you all dress different.  You’re Lakers fans, Celtics fans, maybe even some hockey fans.  (Laughter.)  And because of those who’ve come before you, you have models to follow.  You can work for a company, or start your own.  You can go into politics, or run an organization that holds politicians accountable.  You can write a book that wins the National Book Award, or you can write the new run of “Black Panther.”  Or, like one of your alumni, Ta-Nehisi Coates, you can go ahead and just do both.  You can create your own style, set your own standard of beauty, embrace your own sexuality.  Think about an icon we just lost — Prince.  He blew up categories.  People didn’t know what Prince was doing.  (Laughter.)  And folks loved him for it.  You need to have the same confidence.  Or as my daughters tell me all the time, “You be you, Daddy.”  (Laughter.)  Sometimes Sasha puts a variation on it — “You do you, Daddy.”  (Laughter.)  And because you’re a black person doing whatever it is that you’re doing, that makes it a black thing.  Feel confident. Second, even as we each embrace our own beautiful, unique, and valid versions of our blackness, remember the tie that does bind us as African Americans — and that is our particular awareness of injustice and unfairness and struggle.  That means we cannot sleepwalk through life.  We cannot be ignorant of history.  (Applause.)  We can’t meet the world with a sense of entitlement.  We can’t walk by a homeless man without asking why a society as wealthy as ours allows that state of affairs to occur.   We can’t just lock up a low-level dealer without asking why this boy, barely out of childhood, felt he had no other options.  We have cousins and uncles and brothers and sisters who we remember were just as smart and just as talented as we were, but somehow got ground down by structures that are unfair and unjust.  And that means we have to not only question the world as it is, and stand up for those African Americans who haven’t been so lucky — because, yes, you’ve worked hard, but you’ve also been lucky.  That’s a pet peeve of mine:  People who have been successful and don’t realize they’ve been lucky.  That God may have blessed them; it wasn’t nothing you did.  So don’t have an attitude.  But we must expand our moral imaginations to understand and empathize with all people who are struggling, not just black folks who are struggling — the refugee, the immigrant, the rural poor, the transgender person, and yes, the middle-aged white guy who you may think has all the advantages, but over the last several decades has seen his world upended by economic and cultural and technological change, and feels powerless to stop it.  You got to get in his head, too. Number three:  You have to go through life with more than just passion for change; you need a strategy.  I’ll repeat that.  I want you to have passion, but you have to have a strategy.  Not just awareness, but action.  Not just hashtags, but votes. You see, change requires more than righteous anger.  It requires a program, and it requires organizing.  At the 1964 Democratic Convention, Fannie Lou Hamer — all five-feet-four-inches tall — gave a fiery speech on the national stage.  But then she went back home to Mississippi and organized cotton pickers.  And she didn’t have the tools and technology where you can whip up a movement in minutes.  She had to go door to door.  And I’m so proud of the new guard of black civil rights leaders who understand this.  It’s thanks in large part to the activism of young people like many of you, from Black Twitter to Black Lives Matter, that America’s eyes have been opened — white, black, Democrat, Republican — to the real problems, for example, in our criminal justice system. But to bring about structural change, lasting change, awareness is not enough.  It requires changes in law, changes in custom.  If you care about mass incarceration, let me ask you:  How are you pressuring members of Congress to pass the criminal justice reform bill now pending before them?  (Applause.)  If you care about better policing, do you know who your district attorney is?  Do you know who your state’s attorney general is?  Do you know the difference?  Do you know who appoints the police chief and who writes the police training manual?  Find out who they are, what their responsibilities are.  Mobilize the community, present them with a plan, work with them to bring about change, hold them accountable if they do not deliver.  Passion is vital, but you’ve got to have a strategy. And your plan better include voting — not just some of the time, but all the time.  (Applause.)  It is absolutely true that 50 years after the Voting Rights Act, there are still too many barriers in this country to vote.  There are too many people trying to erect new barriers to voting.  This is the only advanced democracy on Earth that goes out of its way to make it difficult for people to vote.  And there’s a reason for that.  There’s a legacy to that. But let me say this:  Even if we dismantled every barrier to voting, that alone would not change the fact that America has some of the lowest voting rates in the free world.  In 2014, only 36 percent of Americans turned out to vote in the midterms — the secondlowest participation rate on record.  Youth turnout — that would be you — was less than 20 percent.  Less than 20 percent.  Four out of five did not vote.  In 2012, nearly two in three African Americans turned out.  And then, in 2014, only two in five turned out.  You don’t think that made a difference in terms of the Congress I’ve got to deal with?  And then people are wondering, well, how come Obama hasn’t gotten this done?  How come he didn’t get that done?  You don’t think that made a difference?  What would have happened if you had turned out at 50, 60, 70 percent, all across this country?  People try to make this political thing really complicated.  Like, what kind of reforms do we need?  And how do we need to do that?  You know what, just vote.  It’s math.  If you have more votes than the other guy, you get to do what you want.  (Laughter.)  It’s not that complicated.  And you don’t have excuses.   You don’t have to guess the number of jellybeans in a jar or bubbles on a bar of soap to register to vote.  You don’t have to risk your life to cast a ballot.  Other people already did that for you.  (Applause.) Your grandparents, your great grandparents might be here today if they were working on it.  What’s your excuse?  When we don’t vote, we give away our power, disenfranchise ourselves — right when we need to use the power that we have; right when we need your power to stop others from taking away the vote and rights of those more vulnerable than you are — the elderly and the poor, the formerly incarcerated trying to earn their second chance.So you got to vote all the time, not just when it’s cool, not just when it’s time to elect a President, not just when you’re inspired.  It’s your duty.  When it’s time to elect a member of Congress or a city councilman, or a school board member, or a sheriff.  That’s how we change our politics — by electing people at every level who are representative of and accountable to us.  It is not that complicated.  Don’t make it complicated. And finally, change requires more than just speaking out — it requires listening, as well.  In particular, it requires listening to those with whom you disagree, and being prepared to compromise.  When I was a state senator, I helped pass Illinois’s first racial profiling law, and one of the first laws in the nation requiring the videotaping of confessions in capital cases.  And we were successful because, early on, I engaged law enforcement.  I didn’t say to them, oh, you guys are so racist, you need to do something.  I understood, as many of you do, that the overwhelming majority of police officers are good, and honest, and courageous, and fair, and love the communities they serve.  And we knew there were some bad apples, and that even the good cops with the best of intentions — including, by the way, African American police officers — might have unconscious biases, as we all do.  So we engaged and we listened, and we kept working until we built consensus.  And because we took the time to listen, we crafted legislation that was good for the police — because it improved the trust and cooperation of the community — and it was good for the communities, who were less likely to be treated unfairly.  And I can say this unequivocally:  Without at least the acceptance of the police organizations in Illinois, I could never have gotten those bills passed.  Very simple.  They would have blocked them.  The point is, you need allies in a democracy.  That’s just the way it is.  It can be frustrating and it can be slow.  But history teaches us that the alternative to democracy is always worse.  That’s not just true in this country.  It’s not a black or white thing.  Go to any country where the give and take of democracy has been repealed by one-party rule, and I will show you a country that does not work.  And democracy requires compromise, even when you are 100 percent right.  This is hard to explain sometimes.  You can be completely right, and you still are going to have to engage folks who disagree with you.  If you think that the only way forward is to be as uncompromising as possible, you will feel good about yourself, you will enjoy a certain moral purity, but you’re not going to get what you want.  And if you don’t get what you want long enough, you will eventually think the whole system is rigged.  And that will lead to more cynicism, and less participation, and a downward spiral of more injustice and more anger and more despair.  And that’s never been the source of our progress.  That’s how we cheat ourselves of progress. We remember Dr. King’s soaring oratory, the power of his letter from a Birmingham jail, the marches he led.  But he also sat down with President Johnson in the Oval Office to try and get a Civil Rights Act and a Voting Rights Act passed.  And those two seminal bills were not perfect — just like the Emancipation Proclamation was a war document as much as it was some clarion call for freedom.  Those mileposts of our progress were not perfect.  They did not make up for centuries of slavery or Jim Crow or eliminate racism or provide for 40 acres and a mule.  But they made things better.  And you know what, I will take better every time.  I always tell my staff — better is good, because you consolidate your gains and then you move on to the next fight from a stronger position.  Brittany Packnett, a member of the Black Lives Matter movement and Campaign Zero, one of the Ferguson protest organizers, she joined our Task Force on 21st Century Policing.  Some of her fellow activists questioned whether she should participate.  She rolled up her sleeves and sat at the same table with big city police chiefs and prosecutors.  And because she did, she ended up shaping many of the recommendations of that task force.  And those recommendations are now being adopted across the country — changes that many of the protesters called for.  If young activists like Brittany had refused to participate out of some sense of ideological purity, then those great ideas would have just remained ideas.  But she did participate.  And that’s how change happens. America is big and it is boisterous and it is more diverse than ever.  The president told me that we’ve got a significant Nepalese contingent here at Howard.  I would not have guessed that.  Right on.  But it just tells you how interconnected we’re becoming.  And with so many folks from so many places, converging, we are not always going to agree with each other.  Another Howard alum, Zora Neale Hurston, once said — this is a good quote here:  “Nothing that God ever made is the same thing to more than one person.”  Think about that.  That’s why our democracy gives us a process designed for us to settle our disputes with argument and ideas and votes instead of violence and simple majority rule.  So don’t try to shut folks out, don’t try to shut them down, no matter how much you might disagree with them.  There’s been a trend around the country of trying to get colleges to disinvite speakers with a different point of view, or disrupt a politician’s rally.  Don’t do that — no matter how ridiculous or offensive you might find the things that come out of their mouths.  Because as my grandmother used to tell me, every time a fool speaks, they are just advertising their own ignorance.  Let them talk.  Let them talk.  If you don’t, you just make them a victim, and then they can avoid accountability.  That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t challenge them.  Have the confidence to challenge them, the confidence in the rightness of your position.  There will be times when you shouldn’t compromise your core values, your integrity, and you will have the responsibility to speak up in the face of injustice.  But listen.  Engage.  If the other side has a point, learn from them.  If they’re wrong, rebut them.  Teach them.  Beat them on the battlefield of ideas.  And you might as well start practicing now, because one thing I can guarantee you — you will have to deal with ignorance, hatred, racism, foolishness, trifling folks.  (Laughter.)  I promise you, you will have to deal with all that at every stage of your life.  That may not seem fair, but life has never been completely fair.  Nobody promised you a crystal stair.  And if you want to make life fair, then you’ve got to start with the world as it is. So that’s my advice.  That’s how you change things.  Change isn’t something that happens every four years or eight years; change is not placing your faith in any particular politician and then just putting your feet up and saying, okay, go.  Change is the effort of committed citizens who hitch their wagons to something bigger than themselves and fight for it every single day.  That’s what Thurgood Marshall understood — a man who once walked this year, graduated from Howard Law; went home to Baltimore, started his own law practice.  He and his mentor, Charles Hamilton Houston, rolled up their sleeves and they set out to overturn segregation.  They worked through the NAACP.  Filed dozens of lawsuits, fought dozens of cases.  And after nearly 20 years of effort — 20 years — Thurgood Marshall ultimately succeeded in bringing his righteous cause before the Supreme Court, and securing the ruling in Brown v. Board of Education that separate could never be equal.  (Applause.)  Twenty years.  Marshall, Houston — they knew it would not be easy.  They knew it would not be quick.  They knew all sorts of obstacles would stand in their way.  They knew that even if they won, that would just be the beginning of a longer march to equality.  But they had discipline.  They had persistence.  They had faith — and a sense of humor.  And they made life better for all Americans. And I know you graduates share those qualities.  I know it because I’ve learned about some of the young people graduating here today.  There’s a young woman named Ciearra Jefferson, who’s graduating with you.  And I’m just going to use her as an example.  I hope you don’t mind, Ciearra.  Ciearra grew up in Detroit and was raised by a poor single mom who worked seven days a week in an auto plant.  And for a time, her family found themselves without a place to call home.  They bounced around between friends and family who might take them in.  By her senior year, Ciearra was up at 5:00 am every day, juggling homework, extracurricular activities, volunteering, all while taking care of her little sister.  But she knew that education was her ticket to a better life.  So she never gave up.  Pushed herself to excel.  This daughter of a single mom who works on the assembly line turned down a full scholarship to Harvard to come to Howard.  (Applause.)  And today, like many of you, Ciearra is the first in her family to graduate from college.  And then, she says, she’s going to go back to her hometown, just like Thurgood Marshall did, to make sure all the working folks she grew up with have access to the health care they need and deserve.  As she puts it, she’s going to be a “change agent.”  She’s going to reach back and help folks like her succeed. And people like Ciearra are why I remain optimistic about America.  (Applause.)  Young people like you are why I never give in to despair.  James Baldwin once wrote, “Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” Graduates, each of us is only here because someone else faced down challenges for us.  We are only who we are because someone else struggled and sacrificed for us.  That’s not just Thurgood Marshall’s story, or Ciearra’s story, or my story, or your story — that is the story of America.  A story whispered by slaves in the cotton fields, the song of marchers in Selma, the dream of a King in the shadow of Lincoln.  The prayer of immigrants who set out for a new world.  The roar of women demanding the vote.  The rallying cry of workers who built America.  And the GIs who bled overseas for our freedom.  Now it’s your turn.  And the good news is, you’re ready.  And when your journey seems too hard, and when you run into a chorus of cynics who tell you that you’re being foolish to keep believing or that you can’t do something, or that you should just give up, or you should just settle — you might say to yourself a little phrase that I’ve found handy these last eight years:  Yes, we can. Congratulations, Class of 2016!  (Applause.)  Good luck!  God bless you.  God bless the United States of America.  I’m proud of you.                                   END                12:33 P.M. EDT (May 7, 2016) 11:47 A.M. EDT President Barack Obama delivers Howard University’s commencement speech during the 2016 Howard University graduation ceremony in Washington, Saturday, May 7, 2016. Obama says the country is “a better place today” than when he graduated from college more than 30 years ago, citing his historic election as “one indicator of how attitudes have changed.” ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)(Howard UniversityWashington, D.C.)last_img read more

Weaving a continuity of expressions

Weaving a continuity of expressions

first_imgPratha Parv – a festival of folk, tribal and traditional cultural expressions of India is being presented by Sangeet Natak Akademi, a national academy of music, dance and drama and an autonomous body under the Ministry of Culture, Government of India.In a country as vast and layered with history, antiquity and diversity, it is the realm of performing arts in which a deep connection of various genres of art or skill can be seen weaving a continuity of expressions.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfTraditional cultural expressions also called ‘expressions of folklore’ may include music, dance, art, designs, names, signs and symbols, performances, ceremonies, architectural forms, handicrafts and narratives, or many other artistic or cultural expressions including the folk and tribal art. These, which essentially form parts of the identity and heritage of a traditional or indigenous community, are passed down from generation to generation, and are integral to the cultural and social identities of indigenous and local communities. They transmit core values and beliefs. And primarily, these notions are constantly developing and being recreated within the community ie the practitioners and connoisseurs and passed on to new generations as future protectors of the shared legacy. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe festival comprises presentations of diverse forms of performing arts, film screenings sourced from the meticulously cultivated archives of the Akademi exhibition and dissemination of various musical instruments, folk and traditional, from different states of the country (primarily North-East, Odisha, Kerala and Uttarakhand). The programme also includes interactive session with artists who will share their traditional methodologies and other related aspects that may bring forth the tangible and intangible aspects to incorporate verbal expressions or symbols (stories, epics, legends, tales, riddles), musical expressions (songs, instrumental music), expressions by action (dance form, play, ritual), tangible expressions (drawings, designs, paintings, body art, carvings, woodwork, metal work, jewellery, glassware, textiles, costumes) and  intangible expressions reflecting traditional forms of thought and architectural forms. The festival is an opportunity to bringing into limelight and assimilating a variety of cultural aspects of the country, as defined as North, South, East, and West and the resplendent North-East. Each day of the festival is based on this cultural classification, which aims to enhance and safeguard the inherent plurality of the cultural identity that this country so strongly identifies with.last_img read more

Spanish cable operator ONO has preregistered 320

Spanish cable operator ONO has preregistered 320

first_imgSpanish cable operator ONO has pre-registered 32,000 customers for its TiVo service, which was soft-launched last month.ONO will roll out the TiVo service across its networks in the coming quarters. The company will be hoping that TiVo will provide a strong marketing tool for its TV services after a difficult third quarter. The company saw a quarter-on-quarter decline of 7,000 residential revenue-generating units for the three months to the end of September, taking its total to 4.245 million. The company’s residential RGU base grew by 2.5% year-on-year.ONO had 1.813 million customers on its fibre network at the end of September, down 0.3% quarter-on-quarter and up 0.2% year-on-year. ARPU per customer grew year-on-year from €50.80 to €51.70 but churn also grew – from 15.1% to 16.7%.Internet customers stood at 1.42 million, up 0.4% quarter-on-quarter and 4.4% year-on-year. TV customers stood at 939,000, down 1.3% quarter-on-quarter and down 0.9% year-on-year.ONO posted revenues of €371 million for the quarter, up 2.5% year-on-year. EBITDA was €191 million, up 2.8%.The company noted that Spain’s telecoms sector had continued to show weakness during the quarter. It said it had achieved a good set of operating results given the very difficult and volatile market environment.last_img read more

Netflix password sharing is done in less than one

Netflix password sharing is done in less than one

first_imgNetflix password sharing is done in less than one in ten homes globally that take the service, with the practise “not as prolific as many believe,” according to Ampere Analysis.The research firm said that while account sharing by Netflix users is higher than with other SVOD services like Amazon Prime, the amount of password sharing that takes place varies by market.The least amount of Netflix was sharing is in the US, although countries with usually high rates of piracy such as Brazil and Spain were also found to have some of the lowest levels of sharing.France had the highest percentage of shared access but the lowest level of Netflix uptake. Ampere said this may point to a correlation between established Netflix markets having less shared use.“There is a widely-held belief that password sharing among Netflix homes is rife, but our data is telling a different story,” said Ampere Analysis research director, Guy Bisson. “One of the most striking things about account sharing on Netflix is that it’s amazingly consistent across markets.“What this 9% grey area means to an optimist is that Netflix has a potential revenue gain that can be switched on at will by locking down account sharing, but it’s more likely to be seen as an additional – and likely very effective – marketing and subscriber acquisition cost.”Ampere said that 4% of Amazon Prime users share accounts, around half the level of Netflix users that do the same.last_img read more

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it will be a game of confidence, There is unprecedented Chinese interest in football, beating her and slitting her throat in an attempted murder. There is one glaring disparity between the actual home and the one in the filmits not located at 4 Privet Drive, PTI Moily said Rahul has a "new approach and new method". but its not. BERLIN (Reuters) – German Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Tuesday that Russia, “It really doesn’t matter if you hate this song or you don’t like this song, or for my father but ourselves. Are you a natural leader or a follower or both?

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whose list also features MB Power (Madhya Pradesh) Limited and Jaiprakash Power Ventures Limited,Adam Levine/Flickr Researchers have found new clues to how the “talking drums” of one Amazonian tribe convey their messages. Another triumph will help Mercedes get back on track after early season blunders that prompted a bout of hand-wringing in the team. The victimscameraman Adam Ward, has played in all four junior Grand Slams. I assure you, genocide, As a popular 16-year-old,"According to 9Gag, We are the Nurse/Midwives that were captured by Junudul Khalifa under Abu Musab Albarnawi.

everywhere I go, said there haven’t been any serious discussions considering rent control because of the area’s great opportunity for oil-related economic development.Sukut said a more viable solution would be to raise and then make available more Housing Incentive Funds. 25 of Rio Grande City, We’ll see what happens. read more