Tag: 上海狼族藏凤阁1314

Facebook New Zealand shooting video had fewer than 200 realtime viewers

first_img Tags Share your voice Facebook Now playing: Watch this: Screen recordings, in which people video-recorded the stream on their phones and uploaded that video, were more difficult to automatically detect, according to Sonderby. To fix this issue, the company “expanded to additional detection systems,” which included using sound detection.  The Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, a consortium of technology companies, highlighted more than 800 different versions of the video, Reuters noted.New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern told Parliament on Tuesday that the government is going to look closely at the role social media played in the incident, Bloomberg reported.”We cannot simply sit back and accept that these platforms just exist and what is said is not the responsibility of the place where they are published,” she said. “They are the publisher not just the postman. There cannot be a case of all profit no responsibility.” Getty Images Facebook on Tuesday offered some statistics in its defense following criticism of its struggle to contain the spread of a livestream video of Friday’s mass shooting in New Zealand.The social network said that the stream had fewer than 200 viewers during the live broadcast and that the video got roughly 4,000 views before it was taken down.The numbers were revealed in a blog post by Facebook Deputy General Counsel Chris Sonderby, who said no users reported the video when it was live. The first user report came 12 minutes after the livestream ended, a full 29 minutes after it started. As previously noted, Facebook purged 1.5 million uploads of the video and most (1.2 million) were blocked before going live on the platform. Sonderby said in the Tuesday blog post that the original video was digitally mapped so that Facebook software could detect and block similar videos.On Friday, a gunman in Christchurch attacked Muslims praying at two mosques and livestreamed the shooting on Facebook. The death toll from the incident stands at 50, according to CBS News. Post a comment Internet Services Tech Industry 0 Facebook deletes 1.5M videos after shooting, Democrats… 1:23last_img read more

Us review Jordan Peeles horror flick holds up a dark mirror to

first_img 2019 movies to geek out over Now playing: Watch this: TV and Movies Us tells the story of Adelaide Wilson, a wife and mother whose traumatic childhood experience casts a shadow over a summer beach trip with her family. Trauma haunts survivors for years to come like a shadow they can’t shake, and Us puts the members of the Wilson family face-to-face with their own shadows: doppelgangers in red jumpsuits wielding glinting gold scissors. They’re called The Tethered, and they’ve got a score to settle with their better look-alikes.You could say Us has been hotly anticipated. It follows 2017’s Get Out, a tightly-made, critically acclaimed thriller with a social message that earned Peele an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. It helped set him up as a bright light in the realm of thrills and suspense. In fact, he’s pretty busy these days with projects like the reboot of the Twilight Zone, for which he’s the executive producer and host, and Weird City, a YouTube Original dystopian anthology series. Lupita Nyong’o takes a good long look at herself in Us. Claudette Barius So it’s hard not to make comparisons to Get Out. But where Get Out was a tidy concept, executed in a way that deliberately and carefully guided you through the story toward the big ideas, Us is bigger, broader and perhaps less neat. One of the inevitable questions people will ask about Us is whether it’s scarier than Get Out. Peele gets the dread machine going in the first scene at a beach-side amusement park, and the tensest moments include the Wilson family trying to figure out why people outside are trying to get in. And that old horror staple, the ominous Bible verse, will never not be creepy — in this case, Jeremiah 11:11. You can see the uncomprehending terror on Lupita Nyong’o’s face as she stares at her Tethered counterpart, tears streaming down her cheeks. SXSW 2019 Jordan Peele’s Us gets a new trailer and it’s terrifying 77 Photos 2 Mar 15 • LG ‘Snow White’ makes ice cream from capsules Mar 19 • AOC, Bill Nye and the apocalypse: The insanity of SXSW 2019 1:00 SXSW 2019center_img Mar 15 • Men can now breastfeed reading • Us review: Jordan Peele’s horror flick holds up a dark mirror to Get Out See All Share your voice But while Us shoots for a next level of frightening, it runs into a few weak spots along the way.For one, we learn the Tethered aren’t just knocking on the Wilsons’ door. But that larger plot is pretty vague.The effectiveness of the movie’s humor is also tough to gauge. The audience at SXSW was extremely game, laughing uproariously, even in places where it wasn’t entirely clear whether there was a joke to be had — like when the Tethered first show up in the Wilsons’ driveway, and Gabe Wilson (Winston Duke), who’d been dadding it up hard (in the best way) since the start of the movie, goes outside with a bat and some adopted bravado to try and get these mysterious figures to leave. The audience howled.In a horror film a well-placed quip can cut the tension to not only temporarily relieve the audience but also enable the tension to build back up again. Stick it in the wrong place and the laughs just undercut everything around it.Throughout the film, we’re shown lots of mirrors and reflections, visually reflecting the theme. After all, the Wilsons are seeing themselves like they never have before, though warped.Similarly, Us mirrors Get Out. It’s more scary fare with social commentary. But the copy’s never quite the same as the original.Want another take on Us? See GameSpot’s review here. Comments Tags • It shouldn’t come as a shock that a horror film titled Us plays with the idea that perhaps we are the villains.The film’s writer, director and producer, Jordan Peele, addresses how we fear and hate those we consider to be other without examining ourselves. “Maybe the monster we need to look at has our face,” Peele told the audience at the film’s world premiere during SXSW 2019. “Maybe the evil is us.” Us opens March 22 in the US and UK. Looking in a mirror is one of the recurring motifs of Peele’s new horror flick, and the biggest metaphorical theme too. Movie reviewslast_img read more

Domestic car sales rose 5 in February Sensex sheds 100 points after

first_imgVehicles move past the India Gate war memorial in New Delhi, India, October 1, 2016 (representational image).Reuters file11.38 AM IST: The Sensex and Nifty pared gains after a bullish opening driven by investors cheering results of exit polls that gave the BJP a clear edge over rivals in the key state of Uttar Pradesh. The Sensex was up 24 points at 28,854. Domestic car sales rose 4.9 percent in February to 1,72,623 units while overall passenger sales increased 9 percent to 2,55,359 units, the PTI reported, citing data released by automobile industry body Siam.However, two-wheeler sales remained almost flat at 13.62 lakh units.The Auto index on the BSE was up 0.17 percent. 9.15 AM IST: Stock markets open with a bang, on expected lines in response to the exit poll predictions. The BSE Sensex gained 124 points to reach 29,053 while the NSE Nifty was trading 37 points higher at 8,964. Top Sensex gainers were Hero Motocorp, Adani Ports, GAIL (India) and TCS.Wipro was trading 0.94 percent higher at Rs 488, GAIL was down 0.29 percent at Rs 378 after going ex-bonus on Thursday (ratio was 1:3), Dr Reddy’s Labs was trading 0.29 percent higher at Rs 2,716 despite receiving more than 10 observations after inspection by the US FDA of its manufacturing unit at Duwada, Visakhapatnam.Exit polls by various agencies give close to 180 seats to the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) in the recently-concluded Uttar Pradesh Assembly elections. This could trigger a rally on Indian stock markets. The actual results will be declared on Saturday (March 11), but the party seen as falling short of a clear majority could dampen sentiments for investors.The best possible outcome for the BJP is 251-279 seats predicted by the India Today-Axis My India Poll, placing the saffron party far ahead of the Samajwadi Party-Congress coalition’s 88-112 seats.The Times Now-VMR Exit Poll says the BJP could win 190-210 seats, while the Samajwadi Party-Congress is likely to bag 110-130 seats. The BSP may finish with 57-74, in the 403-member Assembly. Another exit poll, by NewsX-MRC, predicted the BJP to win 185 seats with the Samajwadi Party-Congress finishing second at 120 and the BSP at 90 seats. ABP-Lokniti exit poll gave 164-176 seats to the BJP and 156-169 to the Samajwadi Party-Congress.India TV-C Voter said the BJP will get 155-167 seats while the Samajwadi Party-Congress coalition would finish with 135-147 seats. The poll of polls gave the BJP 179 seats, SP-Congress 136 and the BSP 77 seats.On Thursday, the BSE Sensex closed 27 points higher at 28,929 while the NSE Nifty gained 3 points to end at 8,927. Top gainers on the BSE included Unichem Labs, Inox Wind, Balrampur Chini Mills, SpiceJet and Dish TV.Foreign institutional investors (FIIs/FPIs) scaled down their purchases after spell of huge purchases in the past few days and were net buyers of Indian equities worth Rs 488 crore, according to provisional data published by the National Stock Exchange (NSE). “There was a positive sentiment in the market as continued FIIs buying and hope of GST implementation. Global markets were not encouraging on expectation of US Fed rate hike in 15th March policy meeting. Both Hong Kong and China Index declined 1% each on account of China reporting poor CPI numbers,” brokerage Motilal Oswal Securities said in a note on Thursday.Another analyst advised caution ahead of results. “Tomorrow being the last day before the actual outcome, we would expect some volatility in the market. Hence, it’s advisable to avoid the momentum trading as the market may give few whipsaws.,” Sameet Chavan, Chief Analyst, Technical & Derivatives, Angel Broking.On Wednesday, FIIs were net buyers of stocks worth Rs 3,573 crore, preceded by Rs 920 crore on Tuesday and Rs 564 crore on Monday.The rupee closed at 66.71 to the US dollar on Thursday, unchanged from its previous close. Gold prices closed Rs 250 lower at Rs 29,250 per 10 gm.last_img read more

30pc Freedom Fighters quota to remain unchanged Minister

30pc Freedom Fighters quota to remain unchanged Minister

first_imgAKM Mozammel HuqMinister of liberation war affairs AKM Mozammel Haque said there will be no intervention in the 30 per cent quotas in government jobs for freedom fighters.The minister said this at a press conference on Tuesday morning held by the liberation war affairs ministry at the information and communications department conference room in the secretariat. The conference gave an update on the recent activities and about the reservation of quotas in government jobs for the freedom fighters.The minister also said that, there is nothing to worry for the freedom fighters, their families and the people who believe in the spirit of the liberation war.Referring to the High Court verdict, Mozammel Haque said, there remains the opportunity to fulfil the vacant positions with merit list candidates if eligible freedom fighters’ candidates are not available. But, it is compulsory to reserve 30 per cent quota for the freedom fighters. There is no option to ignore or evade the order. To do anything other than this would be a violation of the court, he added.The minister expressed hope that the secretary-level committee formed by the government for quota review would take their decision consciously. Also the copy of the court verdict has been forwarded to the committee, he said.A High Court bench on 5 March, in answer to a writ petition seeking cancellation of quota, passed an order in favour of upholding the system in government jobs.On 2 July, the government formed a seven-member secretary-level committee headed by the cabinet secretary in the face of growing protest seeking quota reforms across the country by students and job seekers.The newly formed committee has already held a meeting. In this backdrop, the liberation war affairs minister called the conference on the quota issue.The prime minister in parliament declared an abolition of quotas and the quota review committee has started to work on the matter.Minister Mozammel Haque said, as long as the court order is upheld there is no scope for revising the freedom fighters’ quota. If the government wants it must approach the court.The minister said, ‘The committee can give their opinion after reconsidering the rest of the quotas other than this one for freedom fighters. Then the government can act accordingly.”The minister also spoke about the other activities of the liberation war affairs ministry.last_img read more

Authorities Explosive Device Found At Beaumont Starbucks

Authorities Explosive Device Found At Beaumont Starbucks

first_imgwikimedia commonsPolice in a Southeast Texas city say what’s believed to be a “legitimate explosive device” was found outside a Starbucks there.Beaumont police say that a Starbucks employee found the package outside early Thursday morning and then moved it into the coffee shop. Police say that while trying to open the package, the employee noticed a note and then took it back outside and notified law enforcement.Police did not say what the note said.Several law enforcement agencies responded, including the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.Police say the device was later rendered safe by bomb technicians.Police say the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force will lead the ongoing investigation. Sharelast_img

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AT HOWARD UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AT HOWARD UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

first_imgTHE PRESIDENT:  Thank you!  Hello, Howard!  (Applause.)  H-U! AUDIENCE:  You know! THE PRESIDENT:  H-U! AUDIENCE:  You know! THE PRESIDENT:  (Laughter.)  Thank you so much, everybody.  Please, please, have a seat.  Oh, I feel important now.  Got a degree from Howard.  Cicely Tyson said something nice about me.  (Laughter.)  AUDIENCE MEMBER:  I love you, President! THE PRESIDENT:  I love you back.  To President Frederick, the Board of Trustees, faculty and staff, fellow recipients of honorary degrees, thank you for the honor of spending this day with you.  And congratulations to the Class of 2016!  (Applause.)  Four years ago, back when you were just freshmen, I understand many of you came by my house the night I was reelected.  (Laughter.)  So I decided to return the favor and come by yours. To the parents, the grandparents, aunts, uncles, brothers, sisters, all the family and friends who stood by this class, cheered them on, helped them get here today — this is your day, as well.  Let’s give them a big round of applause, as well.  (Applause.) I’m not trying to stir up any rivalries here; I just want to see who’s in the house.  We got Quad?  (Applause.)  Annex.  (Applause.)  Drew.  Carver.  Slow.  Towers.  And Meridian.  (Applause.)  Rest in peace, Meridian.  (Laughter.)  Rest in peace. I know you’re all excited today.  You might be a little tired, as well.  Some of you were up all night making sure your credits were in order.  (Laughter.)  Some of you stayed up too late, ended up at HoChi at 2:00 a.m.  (Laughter.)  Got some mambo sauce on your fingers.  (Laughter.)  But you got here.  And you’ve all worked hard to reach this day.  You’ve shuttled between challenging classes and Greek life.  You’ve led clubs, played an instrument or a sport.  You volunteered, you interned.  You held down one, two, maybe three jobs.  You’ve made lifelong friends and discovered exactly what you’re made of.  The “Howard Hustle” has strengthened your sense of purpose and ambition.  Which means you’re part of a long line of Howard graduates.  Some are on this stage today.  Some are in the audience.  That spirit of achievement and special responsibility has defined this campus ever since the Freedman’s Bureau established Howard just four years after the Emancipation Proclamation; just two years after the Civil War came to an end.  They created this university with a vision — a vision of uplift; a vision for an America where our fates would be determined not by our race, gender, religion or creed, but where we would be free — in every sense — to pursue our individual and collective dreams. It is that spirit that’s made Howard a centerpiece of African-American intellectual life and a central part of our larger American story.  This institution has been the home of many firsts:  The first black Nobel Peace Prize winner.  The first black Supreme Court justice.  But its mission has been to ensure those firsts were not the last.  Countless scholars, professionals, artists, and leaders from every field received their training here.  The generations of men and women who walked through this yard helped reform our government, cure disease, grow a black middle class, advance civil rights, shape our culture.  The seeds of change — for all Americans — were sown here.  And that’s what I want to talk about today. As I was preparing these remarks, I realized that when I was first elected President, most of you — the Class of 2016 — were just starting high school.  Today, you’re graduating college.  I used to joke about being old.  Now I realize I’m old.  (Laughter.)  It’s not a joke anymore.  (Laughter.) But seeing all of you here gives me some perspective.  It makes me reflect on the changes that I’ve seen over my own lifetime.  So let me begin with what may sound like a controversial statement — a hot take. Given the current state of our political rhetoric and debate, let me say something that may be controversial, and that is this:  America is a better place today than it was when I graduated from college.  (Applause.)  Let me repeat:  America is by almost every measure better than it was when I graduated from college.  It also happens to be better off than when I took office — (laughter) — but that’s a longer story.  (Applause.)  That’s a different discussion for another speech.  But think about it.  I graduated in 1983.  New York City, America’s largest city, where I lived at the time, had endured a decade marked by crime and deterioration and near bankruptcy.  And many cities were in similar shape.  Our nation had gone through years of economic stagnation, the stranglehold of foreign oil, a recession where unemployment nearly scraped 11 percent.  The auto industry was getting its clock cleaned by foreign competition.  And don’t even get me started on the clothes and the hairstyles.  I’ve tried to eliminate all photos of me from this period.  I thought I looked good.  (Laughter.)  I was wrong.  Since that year — since the year I graduated — the poverty rate is down.  Americans with college degrees, that rate is up.  Crime rates are down.  America’s cities have undergone a renaissance.  There are more women in the workforce.  They’re earning more money.  We’ve cut teen pregnancy in half.  We’ve slashed the African American dropout rate by almost 60 percent, and all of you have a computer in your pocket that gives you the world at the touch of a button.  In 1983, I was part of fewer than 10 percent of African Americans who graduated with a bachelor’s degree.  Today, you’re part of the more than 20 percent who will.  And more than half of blacks say we’re better off than our parents were at our age — and that our kids will be better off, too. So America is better.  And the world is better, too.  A wall came down in Berlin.  An Iron Curtain was torn asunder.  The obscenity of apartheid came to an end.  A young generation in Belfast and London have grown up without ever having to think about IRA bombings.  In just the past 16 years, we’ve come from a world without marriage equality to one where it’s a reality in nearly two dozen countries.  Around the world, more people live in democracies.  We’ve lifted more than 1 billion people from extreme poverty.  We’ve cut the child mortality rate worldwide by more than half.  America is better.  The world is better.  And stay with me now — race relations are better since I graduated.  That’s the truth.  No, my election did not create a post-racial society.  I don’t know who was propagating that notion.  That was not mine.    But the election itself — and the subsequent one — because the first one, folks might have made a mistake.  (Laughter.)  The second one, they knew what they were getting.  The election itself was just one indicator of how attitudes had changed.  In my inaugural address, I remarked that just 60 years earlier, my father might not have been served in a D.C. restaurant — at least not certain of them.  There were no black CEOs of Fortune 500 companies.  Very few black judges.  Shoot, as Larry Wilmore pointed out last week, a lot of folks didn’t even think blacks had the tools to be a quarterback.  Today, former Bull Michael Jordan isn’t just the greatest basketball player of all time — he owns the team.  (Laughter.)  When I was graduating, the main black hero on TV was Mr. T.  (Laughter.)  Rap and hip hop were counterculture, underground.  Now, Shonda Rhimes owns Thursday night, and Beyoncé runs the world.  (Laughter.)  We’re no longer only entertainers, we’re producers, studio executives.  No longer small business owners — we’re CEOs, we’re mayors, representatives, Presidents of the United States.  (Applause.) I am not saying gaps do not persist.  Obviously, they do.  Racism persists.  Inequality persists.  Don’t worry — I’m going to get to that.  But I wanted to start, Class of 2016, by opening your eyes to the moment that you are in.  If you had to choose one moment in history in which you could be born, and you didn’t know ahead of time who you were going to be — what nationality, what gender, what race, whether you’d be rich or poor, gay or straight, what faith you’d be born into — you wouldn’t choose 100 years ago.  You wouldn’t choose the fifties, or the sixties, or the seventies.  You’d choose right now.  If you had to choose a time to be, in the words of Lorraine Hansberry, “young, gifted, and black” in America, you would choose right now.  (Applause.) I tell you all this because it’s important to note progress.  Because to deny how far we’ve come would do a disservice to the cause of justice, to the legions of foot soldiers; to not only the incredibly accomplished individuals who have already been mentioned, but your mothers and your dads, and grandparents and great grandparents, who marched and toiled and suffered and overcame to make this day possible.  I tell you this not to lull you into complacency, but to spur you into action — because there’s still so much more work to do, so many more miles to travel.  And America needs you to gladly, happily take up that work.  You all have some work to do.  So enjoy the party, because you’re going to be busy.  (Laughter.)  Yes, our economy has recovered from crisis stronger than almost any other in the world.  But there are folks of all races who are still hurting — who still can’t find work that pays enough to keep the lights on, who still can’t save for retirement.  We’ve still got a big racial gap in economic opportunity.  The overall unemployment rate is 5 percent, but the Black unemployment rate is almost nine.  We’ve still got an achievement gap when black boys and girls graduate high school and college at lower rates than white boys and white girls.  Harriet Tubman may be going on the twenty, but we’ve still got a gender gap when a black woman working full-time still earns just 66 percent of what a white man gets paid.  (Applause.)  We’ve got a justice gap when too many Black boys and girls pass through a pipeline from underfunded schools to overcrowded jails.  This is one area where things have gotten worse.  When I was in college, about half a million people in America were behind bars.  Today, there are about 2.2 million.  Black men are about six times likelier to be in prison right now than white men.  Around the world, we’ve still got challenges to solve that threaten everybody in the 21st century — old scourges like disease and conflict, but also new challenges, from terrorism and climate change.  So make no mistake, Class of 2016 — you’ve got plenty of work to do.  But as complicated and sometimes intractable as these challenges may seem, the truth is that your generation is better positioned than any before you to meet those challenges, to flip the script.  Now, how you do that, how you meet these challenges, how you bring about change will ultimately be up to you.  My generation, like all generations, is too confined by our own experience, too invested in our own biases, too stuck in our ways to provide much of the new thinking that will be required.  But us old-heads have learned a few things that might be useful in your journey.  So with the rest of my time, I’d like to offer some suggestions for how young leaders like you can fulfill your destiny and shape our collective future — bend it in the direction of justice and equality and freedom. First of all — and this should not be a problem for this group — be confident in your heritage.  (Applause.)  Be confident in your Blackness.  One of the great changes that’s occurred in our country since I was your age is the realization there’s no one way to be black.  Take it from somebody who’s seen both sides of debate about whether I’m black enough.  (Laughter.)  In the past couple months, I’ve had lunch with the Queen of England and hosted Kendrick Lamar in the Oval Office.  There’s no straitjacket, there’s no constraints, there’s no litmus test for authenticity.  Look at Howard.  One thing most folks don’t know about Howard is how diverse it is.  When you arrived here, some of you were like, oh, they’ve got black people in Iowa?  (Laughter.)  But it’s true — this class comes from big cities and rural communities, and some of you crossed oceans to study here.  You shatter stereotypes.  Some of you come from a long line of Bison.  Some of you are the first in your family to graduate from college.  (Applause.)  You all talk different, you all dress different.  You’re Lakers fans, Celtics fans, maybe even some hockey fans.  (Laughter.)  And because of those who’ve come before you, you have models to follow.  You can work for a company, or start your own.  You can go into politics, or run an organization that holds politicians accountable.  You can write a book that wins the National Book Award, or you can write the new run of “Black Panther.”  Or, like one of your alumni, Ta-Nehisi Coates, you can go ahead and just do both.  You can create your own style, set your own standard of beauty, embrace your own sexuality.  Think about an icon we just lost — Prince.  He blew up categories.  People didn’t know what Prince was doing.  (Laughter.)  And folks loved him for it.  You need to have the same confidence.  Or as my daughters tell me all the time, “You be you, Daddy.”  (Laughter.)  Sometimes Sasha puts a variation on it — “You do you, Daddy.”  (Laughter.)  And because you’re a black person doing whatever it is that you’re doing, that makes it a black thing.  Feel confident. Second, even as we each embrace our own beautiful, unique, and valid versions of our blackness, remember the tie that does bind us as African Americans — and that is our particular awareness of injustice and unfairness and struggle.  That means we cannot sleepwalk through life.  We cannot be ignorant of history.  (Applause.)  We can’t meet the world with a sense of entitlement.  We can’t walk by a homeless man without asking why a society as wealthy as ours allows that state of affairs to occur.   We can’t just lock up a low-level dealer without asking why this boy, barely out of childhood, felt he had no other options.  We have cousins and uncles and brothers and sisters who we remember were just as smart and just as talented as we were, but somehow got ground down by structures that are unfair and unjust.  And that means we have to not only question the world as it is, and stand up for those African Americans who haven’t been so lucky — because, yes, you’ve worked hard, but you’ve also been lucky.  That’s a pet peeve of mine:  People who have been successful and don’t realize they’ve been lucky.  That God may have blessed them; it wasn’t nothing you did.  So don’t have an attitude.  But we must expand our moral imaginations to understand and empathize with all people who are struggling, not just black folks who are struggling — the refugee, the immigrant, the rural poor, the transgender person, and yes, the middle-aged white guy who you may think has all the advantages, but over the last several decades has seen his world upended by economic and cultural and technological change, and feels powerless to stop it.  You got to get in his head, too. Number three:  You have to go through life with more than just passion for change; you need a strategy.  I’ll repeat that.  I want you to have passion, but you have to have a strategy.  Not just awareness, but action.  Not just hashtags, but votes. You see, change requires more than righteous anger.  It requires a program, and it requires organizing.  At the 1964 Democratic Convention, Fannie Lou Hamer — all five-feet-four-inches tall — gave a fiery speech on the national stage.  But then she went back home to Mississippi and organized cotton pickers.  And she didn’t have the tools and technology where you can whip up a movement in minutes.  She had to go door to door.  And I’m so proud of the new guard of black civil rights leaders who understand this.  It’s thanks in large part to the activism of young people like many of you, from Black Twitter to Black Lives Matter, that America’s eyes have been opened — white, black, Democrat, Republican — to the real problems, for example, in our criminal justice system. But to bring about structural change, lasting change, awareness is not enough.  It requires changes in law, changes in custom.  If you care about mass incarceration, let me ask you:  How are you pressuring members of Congress to pass the criminal justice reform bill now pending before them?  (Applause.)  If you care about better policing, do you know who your district attorney is?  Do you know who your state’s attorney general is?  Do you know the difference?  Do you know who appoints the police chief and who writes the police training manual?  Find out who they are, what their responsibilities are.  Mobilize the community, present them with a plan, work with them to bring about change, hold them accountable if they do not deliver.  Passion is vital, but you’ve got to have a strategy. And your plan better include voting — not just some of the time, but all the time.  (Applause.)  It is absolutely true that 50 years after the Voting Rights Act, there are still too many barriers in this country to vote.  There are too many people trying to erect new barriers to voting.  This is the only advanced democracy on Earth that goes out of its way to make it difficult for people to vote.  And there’s a reason for that.  There’s a legacy to that. But let me say this:  Even if we dismantled every barrier to voting, that alone would not change the fact that America has some of the lowest voting rates in the free world.  In 2014, only 36 percent of Americans turned out to vote in the midterms — the secondlowest participation rate on record.  Youth turnout — that would be you — was less than 20 percent.  Less than 20 percent.  Four out of five did not vote.  In 2012, nearly two in three African Americans turned out.  And then, in 2014, only two in five turned out.  You don’t think that made a difference in terms of the Congress I’ve got to deal with?  And then people are wondering, well, how come Obama hasn’t gotten this done?  How come he didn’t get that done?  You don’t think that made a difference?  What would have happened if you had turned out at 50, 60, 70 percent, all across this country?  People try to make this political thing really complicated.  Like, what kind of reforms do we need?  And how do we need to do that?  You know what, just vote.  It’s math.  If you have more votes than the other guy, you get to do what you want.  (Laughter.)  It’s not that complicated.  And you don’t have excuses.   You don’t have to guess the number of jellybeans in a jar or bubbles on a bar of soap to register to vote.  You don’t have to risk your life to cast a ballot.  Other people already did that for you.  (Applause.) Your grandparents, your great grandparents might be here today if they were working on it.  What’s your excuse?  When we don’t vote, we give away our power, disenfranchise ourselves — right when we need to use the power that we have; right when we need your power to stop others from taking away the vote and rights of those more vulnerable than you are — the elderly and the poor, the formerly incarcerated trying to earn their second chance.So you got to vote all the time, not just when it’s cool, not just when it’s time to elect a President, not just when you’re inspired.  It’s your duty.  When it’s time to elect a member of Congress or a city councilman, or a school board member, or a sheriff.  That’s how we change our politics — by electing people at every level who are representative of and accountable to us.  It is not that complicated.  Don’t make it complicated. And finally, change requires more than just speaking out — it requires listening, as well.  In particular, it requires listening to those with whom you disagree, and being prepared to compromise.  When I was a state senator, I helped pass Illinois’s first racial profiling law, and one of the first laws in the nation requiring the videotaping of confessions in capital cases.  And we were successful because, early on, I engaged law enforcement.  I didn’t say to them, oh, you guys are so racist, you need to do something.  I understood, as many of you do, that the overwhelming majority of police officers are good, and honest, and courageous, and fair, and love the communities they serve.  And we knew there were some bad apples, and that even the good cops with the best of intentions — including, by the way, African American police officers — might have unconscious biases, as we all do.  So we engaged and we listened, and we kept working until we built consensus.  And because we took the time to listen, we crafted legislation that was good for the police — because it improved the trust and cooperation of the community — and it was good for the communities, who were less likely to be treated unfairly.  And I can say this unequivocally:  Without at least the acceptance of the police organizations in Illinois, I could never have gotten those bills passed.  Very simple.  They would have blocked them.  The point is, you need allies in a democracy.  That’s just the way it is.  It can be frustrating and it can be slow.  But history teaches us that the alternative to democracy is always worse.  That’s not just true in this country.  It’s not a black or white thing.  Go to any country where the give and take of democracy has been repealed by one-party rule, and I will show you a country that does not work.  And democracy requires compromise, even when you are 100 percent right.  This is hard to explain sometimes.  You can be completely right, and you still are going to have to engage folks who disagree with you.  If you think that the only way forward is to be as uncompromising as possible, you will feel good about yourself, you will enjoy a certain moral purity, but you’re not going to get what you want.  And if you don’t get what you want long enough, you will eventually think the whole system is rigged.  And that will lead to more cynicism, and less participation, and a downward spiral of more injustice and more anger and more despair.  And that’s never been the source of our progress.  That’s how we cheat ourselves of progress. We remember Dr. King’s soaring oratory, the power of his letter from a Birmingham jail, the marches he led.  But he also sat down with President Johnson in the Oval Office to try and get a Civil Rights Act and a Voting Rights Act passed.  And those two seminal bills were not perfect — just like the Emancipation Proclamation was a war document as much as it was some clarion call for freedom.  Those mileposts of our progress were not perfect.  They did not make up for centuries of slavery or Jim Crow or eliminate racism or provide for 40 acres and a mule.  But they made things better.  And you know what, I will take better every time.  I always tell my staff — better is good, because you consolidate your gains and then you move on to the next fight from a stronger position.  Brittany Packnett, a member of the Black Lives Matter movement and Campaign Zero, one of the Ferguson protest organizers, she joined our Task Force on 21st Century Policing.  Some of her fellow activists questioned whether she should participate.  She rolled up her sleeves and sat at the same table with big city police chiefs and prosecutors.  And because she did, she ended up shaping many of the recommendations of that task force.  And those recommendations are now being adopted across the country — changes that many of the protesters called for.  If young activists like Brittany had refused to participate out of some sense of ideological purity, then those great ideas would have just remained ideas.  But she did participate.  And that’s how change happens. America is big and it is boisterous and it is more diverse than ever.  The president told me that we’ve got a significant Nepalese contingent here at Howard.  I would not have guessed that.  Right on.  But it just tells you how interconnected we’re becoming.  And with so many folks from so many places, converging, we are not always going to agree with each other.  Another Howard alum, Zora Neale Hurston, once said — this is a good quote here:  “Nothing that God ever made is the same thing to more than one person.”  Think about that.  That’s why our democracy gives us a process designed for us to settle our disputes with argument and ideas and votes instead of violence and simple majority rule.  So don’t try to shut folks out, don’t try to shut them down, no matter how much you might disagree with them.  There’s been a trend around the country of trying to get colleges to disinvite speakers with a different point of view, or disrupt a politician’s rally.  Don’t do that — no matter how ridiculous or offensive you might find the things that come out of their mouths.  Because as my grandmother used to tell me, every time a fool speaks, they are just advertising their own ignorance.  Let them talk.  Let them talk.  If you don’t, you just make them a victim, and then they can avoid accountability.  That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t challenge them.  Have the confidence to challenge them, the confidence in the rightness of your position.  There will be times when you shouldn’t compromise your core values, your integrity, and you will have the responsibility to speak up in the face of injustice.  But listen.  Engage.  If the other side has a point, learn from them.  If they’re wrong, rebut them.  Teach them.  Beat them on the battlefield of ideas.  And you might as well start practicing now, because one thing I can guarantee you — you will have to deal with ignorance, hatred, racism, foolishness, trifling folks.  (Laughter.)  I promise you, you will have to deal with all that at every stage of your life.  That may not seem fair, but life has never been completely fair.  Nobody promised you a crystal stair.  And if you want to make life fair, then you’ve got to start with the world as it is. So that’s my advice.  That’s how you change things.  Change isn’t something that happens every four years or eight years; change is not placing your faith in any particular politician and then just putting your feet up and saying, okay, go.  Change is the effort of committed citizens who hitch their wagons to something bigger than themselves and fight for it every single day.  That’s what Thurgood Marshall understood — a man who once walked this year, graduated from Howard Law; went home to Baltimore, started his own law practice.  He and his mentor, Charles Hamilton Houston, rolled up their sleeves and they set out to overturn segregation.  They worked through the NAACP.  Filed dozens of lawsuits, fought dozens of cases.  And after nearly 20 years of effort — 20 years — Thurgood Marshall ultimately succeeded in bringing his righteous cause before the Supreme Court, and securing the ruling in Brown v. Board of Education that separate could never be equal.  (Applause.)  Twenty years.  Marshall, Houston — they knew it would not be easy.  They knew it would not be quick.  They knew all sorts of obstacles would stand in their way.  They knew that even if they won, that would just be the beginning of a longer march to equality.  But they had discipline.  They had persistence.  They had faith — and a sense of humor.  And they made life better for all Americans. And I know you graduates share those qualities.  I know it because I’ve learned about some of the young people graduating here today.  There’s a young woman named Ciearra Jefferson, who’s graduating with you.  And I’m just going to use her as an example.  I hope you don’t mind, Ciearra.  Ciearra grew up in Detroit and was raised by a poor single mom who worked seven days a week in an auto plant.  And for a time, her family found themselves without a place to call home.  They bounced around between friends and family who might take them in.  By her senior year, Ciearra was up at 5:00 am every day, juggling homework, extracurricular activities, volunteering, all while taking care of her little sister.  But she knew that education was her ticket to a better life.  So she never gave up.  Pushed herself to excel.  This daughter of a single mom who works on the assembly line turned down a full scholarship to Harvard to come to Howard.  (Applause.)  And today, like many of you, Ciearra is the first in her family to graduate from college.  And then, she says, she’s going to go back to her hometown, just like Thurgood Marshall did, to make sure all the working folks she grew up with have access to the health care they need and deserve.  As she puts it, she’s going to be a “change agent.”  She’s going to reach back and help folks like her succeed. And people like Ciearra are why I remain optimistic about America.  (Applause.)  Young people like you are why I never give in to despair.  James Baldwin once wrote, “Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” Graduates, each of us is only here because someone else faced down challenges for us.  We are only who we are because someone else struggled and sacrificed for us.  That’s not just Thurgood Marshall’s story, or Ciearra’s story, or my story, or your story — that is the story of America.  A story whispered by slaves in the cotton fields, the song of marchers in Selma, the dream of a King in the shadow of Lincoln.  The prayer of immigrants who set out for a new world.  The roar of women demanding the vote.  The rallying cry of workers who built America.  And the GIs who bled overseas for our freedom.  Now it’s your turn.  And the good news is, you’re ready.  And when your journey seems too hard, and when you run into a chorus of cynics who tell you that you’re being foolish to keep believing or that you can’t do something, or that you should just give up, or you should just settle — you might say to yourself a little phrase that I’ve found handy these last eight years:  Yes, we can. Congratulations, Class of 2016!  (Applause.)  Good luck!  God bless you.  God bless the United States of America.  I’m proud of you.                                   END                12:33 P.M. EDT (May 7, 2016) 11:47 A.M. EDT President Barack Obama delivers Howard University’s commencement speech during the 2016 Howard University graduation ceremony in Washington, Saturday, May 7, 2016. Obama says the country is “a better place today” than when he graduated from college more than 30 years ago, citing his historic election as “one indicator of how attitudes have changed.” ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)(Howard UniversityWashington, D.C.)last_img read more

Serving health and taste in a platter

Serving health and taste in a platter

first_imgHow many times have you tried and failed at achieving that fit, no-flab body? ‘Eat good, feel good’ only remains as a saying for many people who ‘cannot resist the desire of that one last sweet bite off the brownie. With changing situations many are turning towards food with high nutrition value. But compromising with taste just to eat a healthy snack doesn’t really make one happy. “A healthy diet doesn’t have to be devoid of carbs or fats, when you can simultaneously make healthy delicious,” said Chef Vinod Saini, Master Chef Indian, The Leela Palace, who at Banarsidas Chandiwala Institute of Hotel Management and Catering, recently judged a hospitality competition organised by Association of Hospitality Professionals. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe Chef has suggested some scrumptious recipes that can be easily made and is a healthy yet tasty option for people who want to eat well:QUINOA SALAD:Quinoa is the most protein rich food and contains twice as much as fibre as other grains. Ingredients Qty Quinoa Grains white 30 gmsQuinoa Grains black 50 mlAssorted nuts 20 mlOrange Segments 70 gmsGrapefruit segments 70 gmsChopped parsley 5 gmsFresh Strawberries 100 gmsCherry tomatoes 80 gmsDried cranberries 60 ml Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveMandarins juice 100 mlMixed Lettuce 30gmsSalt to taste Honey Lemon Vinaigrette dressing 40mlMethodBoil water in a large saucepan. Add both Quinoa black/white separately and let it cool in fridge. Chop the nuts and citrus fruits length wise along with strawberries. Keep the dried cranberries whole and cut the cherry tomatoes into halves. Mix everything together gently and add dressing and a pinch of salt. Serve chilled.Wild rice khichadi:Ingredients Qty Wild rice 40gmsBrown rice 30gmsBroccoli 100gmsGreen beans 80gemsOlive oil 70mlCrushed pepper 2gmsGinger chopped 5 gmsCherry tomatoes 50 gmsFresh coriander 20 gmsChop green chilli 10 gmsCoconut milk 80 mlMethod of preparationSoak wild and brown rice separately for half an hour and then boil them by adding salt. Blanch broccoli and green beans and keep aside. Take a thick bottom saucepan, add olive oil and sauté green chilli and ginger with vegetables. Add boiled rice and cook for few minutes and then add cherry tomatoes and coconut milk. Garnish with chopped coriander and serve.last_img read more

Qatar Airways suspends flights to UAE Egypt Bahrain

Qatar Airways suspends flights to UAE Egypt Bahrain

first_img Travelweek Group Tags: Qatar, Qatar Airways Qatar Airways suspends flights to UAE, Egypt, Bahrain Tuesday, June 6, 2017 DUBAI — Qatar Airways has canceled flights to Bahrain, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates from Tuesday until further notice, the airline said on its website, a day after it had suspended flights to Saudi Arabia.The airline said passengers holding a confirmed Qatar Airways ticket to any of the four countries between June 5 and July 6 are permitted to rebook their flights up to 30 days after their current departure date.Qatar Airways said its offices will continue to operate as normal in affected countries until further notice.On Monday, EgyptAir, flydubai and Bahrain’s Gulf Air joined Etihad and Emirates in saying they would suspend all flights to and from Doha.The move came after Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain severed diplomatic relations with Qatar in a coordinated move, accusing it of support for Islamist militants and Iran.According to the CAPA Center for Aviation, “Losing Saudi, Bahrain and UAE airspace would effectively ground Qatar Airways.”More news:  Visit Orlando unveils new travel trade tools & agent perksSince Qatar has very little airspace and is largely surrounded by Bahrain, a permanent ban by the aforementioned countries would be devastating for Qatar Airways. As Business Insider reports, losing access to Bahrainian airspace would force the airline to fly through airspace they are now barred from to reach their base in Doha.Credit: Business Insider With file from Reuters Posted by Share << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more