Tag: 上海水磨

Australian Camp Diary – Marikki Watego

first_imgFollowing last weekend’s training camp in Queensland, Australian Women’s Open player, Marikki Watego tells us about how the camp went, what the team got up to and how the team is feeling in the lead up to the 2013 Trans Tasman Series.It was the last but definitely one of the most important events on what has been a jam-packed year for Touch Footy; the Open Women’s training camp. In preparation for the Super Trans Tasman Series in 2013, any chance for the team to get together, train and bond as a team, I think is a vital component to walking away with the series in two months’ time. Following my debut in the Trans Tasman series in Mudgee, it was evident that the Kiwis gave us a run for our money and ambushed us with a new hybrid Kiwi-Aussie style of Touch and all credit to them for a competitive series. However, I think in 2013 the Kiwis will face a more finely-oiled machine that is the Australian Open Women’s team. The camp last weekend was only a routine service for this machine to ensure it will be ready for game day come February 2013. The camp kicked off on Saturday 15th in Brisbane with both the Open Women’s and Under 20’s Women’s training at Ballymore. In typical Queensland fashion the weather was as hot as it gets. Most of us lathered up on the sunscreen, some of us not knowing that finger painting it on your face won’t be terribly useful hey Emilee Cherry? But then again, at least Chez wasn’t sporting a ‘Louise Winchester’ singlet tan by the end of the weekend.  After a quick welcome by Belly and introduction to Marto our new manager, we went for warm up. Marto’s warm up was awesome because this kept Oz in check from trying to make us run a cross country before stretches. Karley Banks then took us for some drills, she often suggested watching Dylan Thompson for a few pointers. Sooo Dyl, looks like Touch vids of you will be copping some YouTube hits. The day went pretty quick after that, thanks to a super organised coaching staff who catered to our every need, whether that be a cold sweat towel on the neck, icy cold water in our water bottles and even lunch ready on demand. Our last task for the day was a game against the very skillful Under 20’s Women. The heat, and the fact that there were a lot of sore bodies (from a massive year of Touch) on both teams made the game very tough. They tested every facet of our game and I think it was a great demonstration of mind over matter from our team to play as if none of the external factors had any influence on the task at hand. It was definitely a tiring day but the fun was yet to come. The two day camp was to continue on the Sunshine Coast at Belly’s house which I would like to name ‘Bell Manor’. After a little trek up the coast we finally arrived on the coast and were guided through ‘Bell Manor’ like an episode of MTV Cribs. 14 women and one man in a mansion was a great recipe for team bonding (nothing suss)! The rest of the afternoon was very cruisy but team bonding was at its finest by the end of the night. El capitano Squeeze and the experienced Pete Rogerson were very instrumental in establishing this great time of bonding with some great moments caught on camera. Mrs Hennessey may need to see a professional hairdresser to rectify a little mishap to her lovely locks of hair over the weekend. Sunday was as hot as the day before but ‘Bell Manor’ had some more surprises up its sleeve consisting of kayaking in a bull shark infested canal which was always fun. After the stint of kayaking it was back to business and time to train. We headed off to Belly’s school and trained until midday where the camp concluded. Over all it was a great camp to catch up with the girls, re-run through our game plan and confirm that we were all on the same page. With Belly being happy at where we are at, I think that it’s safe to say we are well on the way to being in peak condition for February 2013. Lastly I would like to say thanks to the TFA High Performance team, Cathy and Wayne for your efforts. A big thank you to Belly and Belly’s family for evacuating the family home to allow for us to stay and also Hayley Rogerson for accommodating some of the girls. Thanks to the guys and girls who came out to give us a run on the Sunny Coast as well. And lastly to Marto, Karley and Belly for such a well organised camp! Related LinksCamp Diary – Marikki Wategolast_img read more

Argo Roads South Peace reminding drivers to slow down due to snow

first_imgFor more information on #shiftintowinter; CLICK HERE DAWSON CREEK, B.C. – Argo Road Maintenence Road Contractor is reminding drivers to slow down as the snow has arrived.Tweeted on Thursday, September 26th, 2019, Argo posted, slow down and adjust your driving speeds according to the weather conditions.Argo’s twitter feed has posted shoulder gravelling has started along the John Hart Hwy (BCHwy 97S) near Fabric Road today and tomorrow. Traffic will be single lane and to expect minor delays.last_img

Special category status to NE states will be restored Rahul

first_imgItanagar: The Congress will restore special category status to all states of the Northeast if voted to power at the Centre, party president Rahul Gandhi said Tuesday, reaching out to the electors of the region where it is a sensitive issue.He also accused the BJP of trying to destroy the social and cultural ethos of the people of the Northeast by imposing on them the “RSS ideology”. Addressing a Congress rally in the run up to the Lok Sabha and Arunachal Pradesh assembly polls to be held simultaneously, Gandhi sought to appeal to the regional sentiments, saying his party will never “attack the language, culture, customs and traditions” of the Northeastern states. “The people of the region are close to Congress’s heart. The Congress has always worked for the development of the region. My party, if voted to power, will restore the special category status to Arunachal Pradesh and other states in the Northeast,” he told a well attended rally at Indira Park here. The Congress party’s last standing citadel in the Northeast fell in November last year when BJP ally Mizo National Front stormed to power in the state. There are some states which require special status because of their “unique problems and difficulties” such as connectivity, terrain and infrastructure, he said. Gandhi said these states had special status when the Congress helmed the central government. The Congress president called Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the BJP’s slogan of “Congress mukt Bharat” an expression of “hatred” towards the main opposition party. “However, the Congress being a secular party would not even want the BJP finished,” he said. Accusing the BJP-led central government of imposing “RSS ideology” across the country, including the Northeast, Gandhi alleged ineligible people with Sangh family background were appointed as vice chancellors. Touching upon yest another sensitive issue of Citizenship (amendmdent) Bill, Gandhi said his party will never allow it to be passed by Parliament as it is detrimental to the people of the region. “We will not allow the suppression of the people of the Northeast,” he asserted. “After the NDA government came to power, the Planning Commission, which was set up for meticulously planned development, keeping in mind the special requirements of the region, was replaced with Niti Aayog. “Earlier, all schemes for northeastern states were planned in due consultation with the respective state governments, but now all planning is done in Delhi,” he added. Noting that Arunachal Pradesh has a special place in the Congress’s scheme of things, Gandhi said his party wants a “bonding of hearts” with the people of the northeastern state. The Congress leader promised his party will give a fresh impetus to infrastructure development in Arunachal Pradesh if voted to power. He also pledged to revive the Special Plan Assistance (SPA) scheme and North East Industrial Policy for giving a boost to the region’s economy. Reaffirming the Congress’s commitment to providing ‘Guaranteed Minimum Income’ to every citizen, Gandhi claimed that instead of giving loans to the unemployed youth of Arunachal Pradesh, the Modi government wrote off the Rs 3.5 lakh crore debt of a handful of industrialists. He dubbed as a “blantant lie” the BJP’s promise of creating two crore jobs a year. “Instead, there are more than two crore unemployed youth now,” he said.last_img read more

TN varsity sex scandal College teacher walks out of jail after 11

first_imgMadurai: A woman college teacher, behind bars for 11 months in connection with the Madurai Kamaraj University (MKU) sex scandal, was released on bail from the central prison here on Wednesday.Suspended assistant professor Nirmala Devi, accused of luring some girl students to extend sexual favours to senior MKU officials to get higher marks and money, was granted bail by the Madras High Court bench here on March 12. Her release was delayed as the bail formalities were completed on Tuesday only, after her brother and a family friend furnished sureties, police said. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Devi was working with the Devanga Arts College in Aruppukottai, affiliated to the MKU. She was arrested on April 16 last year on a complaint filed by the college and a women’s forum after an audio clip of her purported conversation with students went viral on social media. In the audio clip, she purportedly told the girls to “adjust” with some officials “for getting 85 per cent marks and money”. Devi, who has denied the allegations, was suspended by the college following an internal enquiry. The Crime Branch-CID of Tamil Nadu police had filed the charge sheet in the case, booking Devi for several offences under the Indian Penal Code, Immoral Traffic (Prevention) Act, Tamil Nadu Prohibition of Harassment of Women Act and Information Technology Act.last_img read more

The inimitable Chowkidar

first_imgThe humble chaiwala has lost his pride of place. Even the familiar Gorkha has been fired; along with him are gone his night howls of ‘hoshiar raho’. It is because Prime Minister Modi gave a clarion call to every citizen to become a chowkidar to protect our nation. Yes, he has done a great service in reminding us of our duty, albeit it is through protecting our democracy. For this, we need to choose the right chowkidar-in-chief, who would honour the very principles of democracy; and is committed to making us happy and changing our lowly position in the World Happiness Report Index. Also Read – A special kind of bondThe World Happiness Report of the UN looked at six key variables – well-being, income, freedom, trust, healthy life expectancy, social support, and generosity. India stands at 140 among 156 countries in the survey of 2018, down by seven notches over the previous year. Finland is the happiest for the second year in a row, while Denmark has been consistently in the top five for the past five years. Are we really as unhappy as the survey says? Let us have a look at each of the parameters. Also Read – Insider threat managementFirstly, well-being. Our philosophy, Yoga, and Upanishads emphasise well-being and happiness as a state of complete physical, social, mental, and spiritual well-being and harmony with nature. But, the increasing stress of modern day life has robbed us of our mental peace and happiness. Studies have reported that extended families have more ‘life satisfaction’ than nuclear families which is a norm now. They further indicate that by 2025, over 38 million years of healthy life will be lost to mental illness in our country. Further, there is a total change in our cultural values. Leaders telling lies on oath, rendering ethics and values of no consequence, is so common. Alongside globalisation, religion too has become commercialised – profit and wealth being the primary objectives. In contrast, until recent times immediate well-being was not considered as important as the ultimate well-being. Religion is no longer a solace since the culture of rationality and truth-seeking has been replaced with blind faith, rituals and bigotry. Jesus was killed because he talked about taking business out of the temple, whereas Buddha called into question all the Hindu Gods and rituals, yet, no harm was caused to him. Instead, those who opposed him became his monks when they were convinced in months-long debates. It is not our culture to kill people with blind faith in our beliefs, like what the cow-vigilantes are doing with the blessings of the Party and governments. This change is a serious cause of social tension and unhappiness in the country. Happiness is elusive when we think of income too. Right to equality and equal distribution of wealth is only on paper; governments are pro-rich. The GDP growth of 7 per cent, being claimed by the government, is dubbed by many experts as manipulated. Doubting the figure, because not enough jobs are being created, former RBI governor Raghuram Rajan even seeks to check its veracity by an impartial body. Total employment actually shrank by millions and the rate of unemployment is a whopping 16 per cent. And, whatever wealth is generated, the distribution is skewed. As per Oxfam survey in 2018, richest 1 per cent Indians cornered 73 per cent of Rs 20.9 lakh crores of wealth generated, while the rise is only 1 per cent for the poorest half of 67 crore Indians. Previous year’s survey showed the richest 1 per cent held 58 per cent of the country’s total wealth. Now, regarding freedom. We have freedom of the press, but the publishers are either induced or coerced into toeing the line of the government. We have freedom of religion, but there are communal tensions caused by bigots. There is freedom to choose professions; but the choice and opportunities are dwindling, with corruption inhibiting them further. One has the freedom to contest elections, but without money-power, it is beyond one’s dream. More than anything else, freedoms of thought and expression are stifled with government action; and freedom of privacy is intruded by snooping into every computer. There is also a great trust deficit. The promise of cooperative federalism is a farce; there is a mockery of democracy – no debates, no press conferences; only witch-hunting opposition with abuse of institutions; there is the only autocracy. Election promises are made only to be broken; election-time sops are only to please the voters. In the absence of a choice, one has to vote only for the better among the worst, who, once elected, would be on sale for voting in Parliament or Assembly. There is also mutual suspicion among people, like in the Big Brother regime. Now for health and social support. Easily available liquor every hundred yards, made so by the government of AP, etc., has proved to be a health hazard. Globalisation, and absence of character building in education, cause great stress and tensions, and there is a telling effect on life-expectancy; and even premature deaths through suicides. Food adulteration is another cause. Private medical treatment is very expensive and government hospitals, mostly, are not comfortable and conducive places. There is social support in terms of myriad welfare schemes, but corruption sabotages the very intentions. And, NGOs, mostly, work for their gains. Overall, for the chowkidars, there has been an increase in negative emotions – anxiety, sadness, anger and worry, distrust and insecurity. Thus, the survey has rightly placed India among the unhappiest countries. But, instead of sulking, it would be prudent to find ways to cheer us up. Happiness is variously defined. Psychologists consider it as ‘a mental or emotional state of well being defined by positive or pleasant emotions ranging from contentment to intense joy’. Sociologists say it is the degree to which an individual judges the overall quality of his life-as-a-whole positively, and refer it as subjective well-being (SWB) or life satisfaction. But quantifying it is difficult. A breakthrough, however, was made by Bhutan by calculating their country’s Gross National Happiness (GNH) and they evolved a single digit Index as a measuring tool for policy-making and to create policy incentives for the government, NGOs and businesses of Bhutan to increase GNH. Good governance, sustainable socio-economic development, cultural preservation and environment conservation are the four pillars that support the nine domains – psychological well-being, health, education, time use, cultural diversity and resilience, good governance, community vitality, ecological diversity and resilience, and living standards, and 33 indicators, which help in reaching the GNH Index. UN also passed a resolution in 2011 in support of this novel concept. While East European countries with no freedoms are low in happiness than poorest democracies, Denmark stands out as an example of happiness and well-being – free from corruption, thrust on health care, gender equality and voluntary work; and they proved the efficacy of cycling in environment protection, fuel saving, accidents, etc. As against the fact that 40 per cent Danes get involved in volunteer activities that generate a feeling of oneness of society, and accountability to each other for common growth, volunteerism is lacking in us. No serious efforts are ever made by us to bring such cohesion. Instead of emulating these examples, the government in power spends crores of rupees in advertising about their bounties and achievements. Any national newspaper of 26- 28 pages would generally have nearly half devoted to full page, half or quarter to advertisements from different government departments, although this does not pay any dividends. There are not even proper mechanisms to assess people’s satisfaction with government projects and schemes. The present systems of vigilance and anti-corruption are grossly inadequate since they only manage statistical targets, and whatever action is taken by them gets riddled in dilatory departmental or legal processes. It is imperative that effective feedback mechanisms are in place for real-time check and corrective action. In the past, apart from using elaborate spying systems and overt feedback mechanisms, benevolent kings themselves used to move incognito to check the well-being of their subjects. It is worthwhile, therefore, to divert the money spent on advertisements for this task since the dividends for the good and sincere work done, and the goodwill generated, are enormous. In a democracy, people’s satisfaction is paramount, like customer satisfaction in commercial establishments. The customer care departments vie with each other to please their customers, while sales departments aggressively advertise their products to lure potential customers. Take for example a pharmaceutical company. Whenever a new product is launched, their salesmen and qualified pharmaceutical degree holders interact with doctors who prescribe them to their patients and get feedback about how much better this new drug is working. Yet, not satisfied, they employ talented engineers and others to get independent feedback from the doctors who are handsomely compensated for the time invested. Similar is the case with sales of vehicles, and so on. It is time that chowkidars become inimitable and assertive, to set things right in our democracy. Revered Hanuman never knew his strength until he was reminded of it. Kumbhkaran had to be awakened from his deep sleep to show his power. For their own well-being and life satisfaction, for effective delivery and improvement in government policies, people should demand a comprehensive model based on Bhutanese and Danish experiences, and also for effective feedback mechanisms, with their participation. Lokpal has to be made proactive and given a pivotal role in this task. Ultimately, the happiness of a nation is the aggregate of the happiness of society and of individuals. For this, a real democrat should be chosen as the chowkidar-in-chief of India. (Dr. N Dilip Kumar is a retired IPS officer and a former member of Public Grievances Commission, Delhi. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

Warned Pak of consequences if pilot not returned PM Modi

first_imgPatan: Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday said he had warned Pakistan of consequences if it did not return Indian Air Force pilot Abhinandan Varthaman.Addressing a poll rally at Patan in Gujarat, he asserted his government’s commitment towards national security and said whether the prime minister’s chair remains or not, he has decided that either he will be alive or the terrorists. He also took a jibe at NCP leader Sharad Pawar, saying if he is unaware of his next move, then how can Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan gauge what he will do. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Modi urged the people of Gujarat to help the BJP win all 26 Lok Sabha seats in his home state, where polling will be held on Tuesday, and said if it does not happen, then there will be discussions on TV over it on the day of vote counting. Following the air strike at Balakot terror camp in Pakistan, there was a dogfight between Indian and Pakistani fighter planes on February 27 in which the IAF wing commander was captured by the neighbouring country and released on the night of March 1. He said after Abhinandan was caught, opposition started seeking a reply from him. “We held a press conference and warned Pakistan that if anything happened to our pilot, you will keep telling the world what Modi did to you.” Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K”A senior American official said on the second day that Modi has kept 12 missiles ready and might attack and the situation will deteriorate. Pakistan announced return of the pilot, or else it was going to be a “qatal ki raat’,” he said. “This was said by America, I have nothing to say about this now, I will speak about it when the time will come,” he said. “The (PM’s) chair remains or goes, I have decided that either I be alive or terrorists will remain alive,” he said. He said the air strike at terror camps in Pakistan was something people expected from him. “When Pulwama happened, what did the country expect Modi to do? Would you, would the country have pardoned me had I done what the Manmohan Singh government did after 26/11,” he asked. The country wanted something to be done, he said, adding that he had announced giving a free hand to the military. “They (Pakistan) made tight arrangements, but being the disciple of Lord Hanuman, our people conducted air strike and their story was over,” he said. Hitting out at the opposition parties, he said the Balakot strike made them uncomfortable. “Pakistan was repeatedly saying India bombed us, but people here were questioning if this was India’s Balakot. They were proved false,” he said. Accusing the Congress of questioning the bravery of India’s military force and doubting its action, he said, “Does any Congress leader ask for air strike proof? They have got the message to stop asking because people are getting angry. After the first and second phases of polls, they have forgotten to ask.” He also took a swipe at Pawar, who on Saturday said he was “terribly afraid” as to what Modi, who once called the NCP chief his mentor in politics, would do next. “Sharad Pawar says I don’t know what will Modi do. If he is unaware of what Modi will do tomorrow, how will Imran Khan know?” he said. He also attacked the Congress for not providing new howitzers to the Army since 1985 and said his government has arranged for artillery manufacturing at three factories in the country.last_img read more

Alcohol intake in India up 38 this decade

first_imgIndia’s annual alcohol intake increased by 38 per cent between 2010 and 2017, according to a study published Wednesday which found the total volume of alcohol consumed globally per year has risen by 70 per cent since 1990. Published in The Lancet journal, the study of 189 countries’ alcohol intake between 1990-2017 and estimated intake up to 2030 suggests that the world is not on track to achieve targets against harmful alcohol use. Between 2010 and 2017, alcohol consumption in India increased by 38 per cent – from 4.3 to 5.9 litres per adult per year, said researchers from TU Dresden in Germany. Over the same timescale, consumption increased slightly in the US (9.3-9.8 litres) and in China (7.1-7.4 litres), they said. Also Read – The Puja carnivalAs a result of increased alcohol consumption and population growth, the total volume of alcohol consumed globally per year has increased by 70 per cent — from 20,999 million litres in 1990 to 35,676 million litres in 2017. Intake is growing in low- and middle-income countries, while the total volume of alcohol consumed in high-income countries has remained stable. The estimates suggest that by 2030 half of all adults will drink alcohol, and almost a quarter (23 per cent) will binge drink at least once a month, researchers said. Also Read – Wave City brings special offers this NavratraAlcohol is a major risk factor for disease, and is causally linked to over 200 diseases, in particular non-communicable diseases and injuries, they said. “Before 1990, most alcohol was consumed in high-income countries, with the highest use levels recorded in Europe,” said study author Jakob Manthey, from TU Dresden. “However, this pattern has changed substantially, with large reductions across Eastern Europe and vast increases in several middle-income countries such as China, India, and Vietnam. “This trend is forecast to continue up to 2030 when Europe is no longer predicted to have the highest level of alcohol use,” said Manthey. He said the World Health Organization (WHO)’s aim of reducing the harmful use of alcohol by 10 per cent by 2025 will not be reached globally. Instead, alcohol use will remain one of the leading risk factors for the burden of disease for the foreseeable future, and its impact will probably increase relative to other risk factors. Over the same period, it also measured prevalence of people who did not drink for their whole lives or were current drinkers (ie, drank alcohol at least once a year) using surveys for 149 countries, and binge drinkers using surveys from 118 countries. In 2017, the lowest alcohol intakes were in North African and Middle Eastern countries (typically less than one litre per adult per year), while the highest intakes were in Central and Eastern European countries (in some cases more than 12 litres per adult per year). Globally, alcohol consumption is set to increase from 5.9 litres pure alcohol a year per adult in 1990 to 7.6 litres in 2030. However, intake varied regionally. Between 2010-2017, consumption increased by 34 per cent in southeast Asia, with increases in India, Vietnam and Myanmar.last_img read more

How The Web Is Predicting Baseballs Hall Of Fame Voting

How The Web Is Predicting Baseballs Hall Of Fame Voting

The Baseball Hall of Fame will announce this year’s voting results Tuesday afternoon, but clever denizens of the Web have a head start on the process. For the past few years, the analytically inclined corner of the sports world (spearheaded by Baseball Think Factory and other sites) have counted the votes from media members who announced their ballots ahead of time — a contingent that includes more than a third of all voters as of Tuesday morning. The most recent projections can be found here.Since the Baseball Hall of Fame Vote Tracker project began in 2009, the early returns have corresponded remarkably well with the voting results:There are some inconsistencies, however. For example, the subset of voters who release their ballots ahead of time tends to align more closely with progressive baseball philosophies, such as the use of advanced metrics and the acceptance of players implicated for using performance-enhancing drugs.That’s why a player such as Mike Piazza, whose legacy has been clouded by vague PED rumors, may fall short of the 75 percent vote threshold needed for induction despite the exit polling listing him near 76 percent Tuesday morning. Or why Tim Raines, who stakes a not-insignificant portion of his claim to the hall on the basis of a strong wins above replacement (WAR) tally, probably won’t exceed the 65 percent mark being predicted by the HoF Tracker.Interestingly, after controlling for WAR and steroid allegations, the voters who fail to make their preferences known ahead of time also have been biased against players whose hall case is unusually tied up in the Hall of Fame Standards metric, which measures career longevity and milestone accumulation. This means non-disclosing voters tend to weigh a player’s peak contributions more heavily than his overall body of work.But even among the known ballots, there are some interesting hints as to how the nonpublic voting will shake out. Noting a rather visually arresting bifurcation among voters, sabermetric impresario Tom Tango has suggested this clustering effect is due to voters being highly polarized on a few hot-button issues. For instance, voters who selected Barry Bonds were very likely to also select Roger Clemens; meanwhile, voting for Fred McGriff or Lee Smith was strongly associated with not putting Bonds or Clemens on a ballot.Those numbers reflect generational differences between voters that will take center stage when we compare the HoF Tracker’s predictions to the voting results.UPDATE (Jan. 6, 3:59 p.m.): On Tuesday afternoon, the Hall of Fame announced that four players had been inducted: Randy Johnson, Pedro Martinez, John Smoltz and Craig Biggio. The players with the biggest deviations between actual voting percentage and the HoF Tracker’s predictions were Curt Schilling (whose actual share was 12.3 percentage points lower than his predicted share), Mike Mussina (11 percent), Raines (9.9 percent) and Lee Smith (whose actual voting percentage was 9.4 points higher than expected). As expected, Piazza also lost too many votes once the private ballots were accounted for; his voting percentage dropped from 76.2 percent in the final pre-announcement data to 69.9 percent in the overall tally. read more

Cold streak stifles Ohio State in loss to Kansas

There are cold streaks and then there’s what happened to the Ohio State men’s basketball team Saturday against Kansas. Trailing by two at halftime, the Buckeyes shot just 25 percent from the field and 11 percent from the 3-point line in the second half, including a stretch of more than 10 minutes in which they didn’t make a field goal. The Buckeyes made four of their first 25 shots in the second half, allowing No. 9 Kansas to pull away for a 74-66 victory against No. 7 OSU. The frigidity of the Buckeyes shooting did not affect Kansas’ Ben McLemore, who many project to be a lottery pick in the 2013 NBA Draft. The Jayhawks’ star redshirt freshman scored 22 points and was one of four Jayhawks to reach double figures. When junior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. finally ended another dry spell for the Buckeyes with a jump shot with 2:18 left in the game, the sold-out crowd at the Schottenstein Center let out a sarcastic cheer that was more a release of frustration than a celebration. The Buckeyes, behind junior forward Deshaun Thomas and sophomore guard Shannon Scott put up a battle, but their 16 and 15 points, respectively, weren’t enough for OSU to earn its first quality win of the season. Kansas took control from the opening tip, flustering OSU with full court pressure in the early going. Two 3-pointers from sophomore guard Sam Thompson kept OSU in it, but Kansas overpowered the Buckeyes inside to jump out to an 11-6 lead with 14:37 remaining in the first half. That’s when Scott entered the game and he made his presence immediately felt. After a 3-pointer from Thomas, the sophomore guard drove to his right past two defenders and laid in a tough shot off the glass. He then stole the ensuing inbounds pass and was fouled going to the rim, making one of two free throws. Later in the half, Scott scored seven points in a 14-0 run by the Buckeyes that saw the home team take its first lead of the game, 31-23. But McLemore proved to be too much for the Buckeyes, though. Kansas’ leading scorer hit three 3-pointers in the first half and scored five straight points in the period’s final minute to help give his team a, 37-35 lead at intermission. McLemore led all scorers at half with 13 points, while Scott chipped in 10 and also dished out three assists. Kansas had their way with OSU inside doubling up the Buckeyes, 20-10, on points from the paint in the first half. OSU fought their way back in the second half, though. Thomas, as he’s been known to do, went on a scoring binge, putting in eight points in the second half’s first seven minutes to help knot up the score at 45 with 13:31 left in the game. The crowd rose to its feet, but that’s when the Buckeyes, who shot 46 percent from behind the arc in the first half started their half-long shooting hibernation. OSU missed eight of their first nine 3-point shots in the second half and Kansas jumped out to a 53-48 lead. When sophomore forward Amir Williams banked in a layup with 8:14 remaining to cut the lead to three, it was OSU’s first made field goal in more than 10 minutes and the Jayhawk lead continued to grow. Down double digits with more under two minutes remaining, OSU was forced to foul, but Kansas’ free throw shooting was enough to put the game away. The loss drops the Buckeyes record to 9-2 as Kansas leaves Columbus 10-1. OSU next plays Chicago State next Saturday at the Schottenstein Center. read more

Mens Hockey Mason Jobst looks to lead Buckeyes back to tournament

Ohio State forward Mason Jobst holds off a Wisconsin forward as he crashes into senior goaltender Matt Tomkins during a Big Ten tournament semifinal game at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit. OSU lost 2-1. Credit: Courtesy of Ric KruszynskiIt would seem that this year could potentially be a step back for the No. 19 Ohio State men’s hockey team, but junior forward Mason Jobst is looking to do his part to avoid any possible regression.The Buckeyes come into this season off their first NCAA tournament bid since 2009. But after a first-round overtime loss to then-No. 2 Minnesota-Duluth, the team lost three goalies and much of its top talent, which included captain and forward Nick Schilkey, who led the team in goals with 27. Jobst is returning from a dominant sophomore campaign in which he tallied 19 goals and 36 assists, led the Big Ten in points with 55 and earned second team All-American honors. Now coming into his junior year, Jobst said while he looks to improve, his goals are more team-oriented.“I think it’s just improving on the last year, being more productive than I was last year,“ Jobst said. “It was a tough loss in the first round of the NCAAs and the second round of the [Big Ten tournament], so just trying push to get further in that, and hopefully win the Big Ten Championship and win a national championship.”Western Michigan assistant coach Todd Krygier still remembers the years he spent coaching Jobst with the United States Hockey League’s Muskegon Lumberjacks in junior hockey. He remembers not only the leadership of Jobst, but also the speed, playmaking ability and hockey IQ as standing out on the ice.“His character was off the charts,” Krygier said. “His work ethic, his ability to get along with others and pull a team together and lead a team on and off the ice was absolutely fantastic.”Krygier added that in his time as Jobst’s coach, the now standout forward received little recognition from other teams and that Ohio State was one of the only teams that reached out to him.“I talked to several NCAA teams over the couple years that I coached him, and Ohio State was the only team that listened,” Krygier said. “So congrats to Ohio State, they obviously made a great decision.”Jobst was named captain for the Buckeyes Wednesday. But Krygier said Jobsts’ leadership had been obvious to him for years prior as he was a captain on Muskegon for his final two seasons. “I’ve learned a lot the last couple of years from Nick Schilkey and I think he was a great leader off the ice and on the ice, so it’s just trying to take parts of what he’d done in the past and what I’ve done to get here and try to lead this team to a championship,” Jobst said.Ohio State head coach Steve Rohlik also understood what types of positive qualities Jobst brings to the team in many aspects.“He’s a kid that carries himself on the ice and off the ice, he’s the one that leads our culture and does the right things,” Rohlik said. “When your team looks at a player like that, everybody feeds off it.”Size has always been the concern for Jobst, who stands 5-foot-8, but Krygier said he knew Jobst would overcome any obstacles in his way.“For Mason to produce in the USHL the way he did, and the style he played and the work ethic he had, there was no doubt in my mind that he was going to be an All-American hockey player,” Krygier said.Jobst said players like future NHL Hall of Famer Martin St. Louis, current Calgary Flames wing Johnny Gaudreau, and Columbus Blue Jackets wing Cam Atkinson — all 5-foot-9 or shorter — are succeeding in ways he hopes to one day. Jobst wears the No. 26 because of St. Louis.“[St. Louis] was kind of a guy that started paving the way for smaller guys in the NHL with how hard he worked and how skilled he was,” Jobst said.Jobst and the No. 19 Buckeyes open the regular season with a pair of games on the road against a Big Ten opponent in No. 12 Wisconsin.“We’re getting right after it, playing a team that knocked us out of the Big Ten playoffs last year so I think we’re itching to get in there, and it should be a good atmosphere and a lot of fun,” Jobst said.Rohlik said Jobst is a special kind of player, and one who should only get better in this upcoming season.“As soon as you become satisfied you’re going to get passed up, and Mason’s not the kid that ever gets satisfied,” Rohlik said. read more

Griezmann wants to decide before the World Cup

Griezmann wants to decide before the World Cup

first_imgAntoine Griezmann’s situation has been very unclear lately but the Frenchman insisted that he hasn’t held any talks with Barcelona but wants to decide before the World Cup over his future.The Atletico attacker has been heavily linked with a possible move to Barcelona but he denied that he has been holding talks with the Catalonian side – but he admitted that he may leave at the end of the season.The former Real Sociedad striker spoke about his future as he said, according to Goal:“I don’t know where you get this information, but it is false.”Fati and Suarez shine against Valencia at Camp Nou Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 15, 2019 With a mesmerizing first half from Ansu Fati and a brace from Luis Suarez in the second half, Barcelona demolished Valencia at Camp Nou.Valencia…“I want to be free and think only about the French team.”“I would like my future to be settled before the World Cup, otherwise, afterwards, we will have questions to the right and the left. I will continue as I am now, giving everything to the club.”“I had a difficult start to the season for several reasons. I expressed things wrongly and made mistakes.”last_img read more

Schmeichel hopes Leicester defender commits future to the club

Schmeichel hopes Leicester defender commits future to the club

first_imgLeicester City’s Kasper Schmeichel is hoping club teammate Harry Maguire ends speculation surrounding his future and commit to the club.Jamie Vardy, Wilfred Ndidi and now Schmeichel have committed their futures to Leicester City, and the Denmark international hopes defender HarryMaguire will be the next to sign up for the project. The defender was a subject of summer interest from Manchester United after an impressive outing at this summer’s World Cup with England and the Foxes are keen to tie him down at the club by offering him a new contract.Schmeichel, who signed a new five-year deal on Friday, said everyone would love to see Maguire agree a new contract, but no one would put any pressure on him.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“I hope Harry signs but I don’t want to put pressure on anyone,” said Schmeichel, according to LeicesterMercury.“It is up to him, his family and his situation. I am not going to start saying anything about his situation because I don’t know enough about it.”“If he feels it is something he wants to do then we would be delighted, but it is up to him.”City certainly showed signs of their youthful promise during the 2-1 defeat to Liverpool at the King Power Stadium.last_img read more

Reiss Nelson drops a hint over Arsenal future

Reiss Nelson drops a hint over Arsenal future

first_imgArsenal loan star Reiss Nelson has stated that he aims to become a club legend as he dropped a hint of a possible return in JanuaryThe 18-year-old forward has already bagged six goals in seven appearances on loan at Hoffenheim this season.Following Danny Welbeck’s horrific injury last week, Nelson has been tipped to make an early return to the Emirates Stadium.Now the teenage star himself hinted that it could happen while discussing his plans to become an Arsenal legend.“Arsenal are my boyhood club,” Nelson told BBC.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“I’ve been with them since I was eight, so that’s 10 years.“I just want to go back there stronger because at the time I was at Arsenal I was 16, 17 and I didn’t feel confident.“I didn’t think I was a man, but now I’m feeling stronger and I think a couple more months or even a year in Hoffenheim will make me strong and give me the belief and confidence to go back to Arsenal and do very good there.“I want to be an Arsenal legend. And, for England, it’s the best. You can’t beat playing for your country I don’t think.”Nelson made 15 appearances for Arsenal last season and signed a new long-term contract with the Gunners in the summer.last_img read more

Report Mario Balotelli could make an unexpected Premier League return

Report Mario Balotelli could make an unexpected Premier League return

first_imgNewcastle are reportedly considering making an approach for Mario Balotelli for this month’s transfer windowRafael Benitez’s side have claimed the second-fewest goals in the Premier League with just 15 from 21 games and currently sit two points above the relegation zone in 15th-place.Therefore, the Daily Mirror claims that Newcastle are eyeing up an approach for Balotelli in order to add some badly needed firepower to the squad.The Italian striker’s stay at OGC Nice appears to be coming to an end after manager Patrick Vieira gave him an additional few days off to decide his future.“I have given Mario a few extra days off to think about his future and what he wants to do,” Vieira said.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“He’s under contract here and everything is possible, if we can come to a common agreement who knows.”After a prolific two seasons at the Allianz Riviera, Balotelli is yet to find the net in all of his 10 Ligue 1 appearances this term following a failed summer move to Marseille.Now it’s understood that Vieira and Nice will allow Balotelli, who will be out of contract in June, to leave for Newcastle if they decide to make an approach.The 28-year-old previously played in the Premier League for Manchester City and Liverpool.last_img read more

Martial hoping for an extended Solskjaer stay

Martial hoping for an extended Solskjaer stay

first_imgAnthony Martial has tipped Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to retain the managerial position at Manchester United on a permanent basis.The French midfielder revealed the entire squad is enjoying the reign of the Norwegian boss ahead of their clash with PSG.Martial scored a superb solo goal in United’s 3-0 win over Fulham on Saturday to enter the top four and further extend the unbeaten run under the 45-year-old to 11 games.French connexion ⚡️⚡️⚡️ pic.twitter.com/6q6N13MBFS— Anthony Martial (@AnthonyMartial) December 22, 2018“Well, obviously things are going really well at the moment. We’re really happy to have him here,” the France forward told a news conference ahead of Tuesday’s mouth-watering Champions League showdown against Paris Saint-Germain.“Sure, I hope we can continue with him. The final decision isn’t down to us but certainly, we’re happy he’s here at the moment.”“We’ve got a coach who’s got different intentions, a different approach,” Martial disclosed via FourFourTwo. “We’re trying to do what he wants us to do.“When our new coach came in he had a lot of confidence and a lot of determination. That’s really a boost to us.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“He had a lot of confidence in us and we’re trying to pay him back in kind.“He’s asking me to attack more, that’s my job after all – to make the difference, as it were, to be more decisive“Things are working out well for the other attackers as well. I hope we can continue to be as effective and efficient.”.@AnthonyMartial: “Obviously things are going really well at the moment so we’re happy to have him [Ole] here with us.” #MUFC pic.twitter.com/5pELklKcg0— Manchester United (@ManUtd) February 11, 2019However, Solskjaer feels that there is still room for improvement when it comes to Martial’s finishing.“He’s often said that to me and even previous managers have said that to me,” he added.“I think if I do manage to do that [and] get beyond the defence then I will score more goals.”last_img read more

Avengers Endgame full Telugu movie leaked online Will its free download affect

first_imgAvengers: Endgame movie reviewTwitterThe full Telugu movie of Avengers: Endgame has been leaked online hours after its release in theatres. The free download of its pirated copy is set to take a toll on its collection at the box office.Avengers: Endgame is the latest and last film in the Avengers series, the American superhero film franchise based on the Marvel Comics superhero team. The first three instalments were dubbed and released in Telugu with the same title and they have become massive hits with the audience in the Telugu states.Avengers: Endgame, which is the 22nd film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), marks the ended of the Avengers film series, which has created a lot of curiosity and hype for the fourth instalment. As usual, the makers have dubbed and released it in Telugu on April 26 in bid to cash in the popularity of the franchise in the state.The screening of Avengers: Endgame began in several centres across the Telugu states in the wee hours of the Telugu states. But some miscreants have allegedly leaked the full movie on the internet for free download soon after the regular morning show got over. They released HQ HDCAM – HQ Line Audio print, which spread to other torrent sites within no time, enabling some viewers to watch it freely. Avengers: EndgameTwitterA miscreants’ gang, which is known for its notorious activities online, allegedly record the complete Telugu film and Avengers: Endgame. This gang’s website offers seven different prints of the full movie ranging from 2.8 GB to 200 MB for free download. Since these are theatre prints, their audio and video quality will not be good.Avengers: Endgame is an action-adventure fantasy thriller movie. It is a 3D film and a lot of VFX works make it a visual treat. Moreover, the background score plays an important role in making it an ethereal experience. But its pirated copy lacks both these features, there will be a lot of disturbance in picturisation and audio quality. It should better be watched in the cinema to get the real of the movie.In fact, the full English movie of Avengers: Endgame was leaked on the internet a week before it hit screens across the world. It has freely available on many torrent site for the last one week. Yet there was a massive amount of advance booking for the film in the Telugu states. Avengers: EndgameTwitterHowever, Avengers: Endgame has been released only in multiplexes, but it is not available in single screens, which are mostly located in suburban areas. The audience, who watch the film in single screens, may resort to downloading the full movie from torrents, which may take a toll on its collection.Avengers: Endgame has been directed by Anthony Russo and Joe Russo. The film features an ensemble cast of Robert Downey Jr, Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth, Scarlett Johansson, Jeremy Renner, Don Cheadle, Paul Rudd, Brie Larson, Karen Gillan, Danai Gurira, Bradley Cooper, and Josh Brolin.last_img read more

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AT HOWARD UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AT HOWARD UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

first_imgTHE PRESIDENT:  Thank you!  Hello, Howard!  (Applause.)  H-U! AUDIENCE:  You know! THE PRESIDENT:  H-U! AUDIENCE:  You know! THE PRESIDENT:  (Laughter.)  Thank you so much, everybody.  Please, please, have a seat.  Oh, I feel important now.  Got a degree from Howard.  Cicely Tyson said something nice about me.  (Laughter.)  AUDIENCE MEMBER:  I love you, President! THE PRESIDENT:  I love you back.  To President Frederick, the Board of Trustees, faculty and staff, fellow recipients of honorary degrees, thank you for the honor of spending this day with you.  And congratulations to the Class of 2016!  (Applause.)  Four years ago, back when you were just freshmen, I understand many of you came by my house the night I was reelected.  (Laughter.)  So I decided to return the favor and come by yours. To the parents, the grandparents, aunts, uncles, brothers, sisters, all the family and friends who stood by this class, cheered them on, helped them get here today — this is your day, as well.  Let’s give them a big round of applause, as well.  (Applause.) I’m not trying to stir up any rivalries here; I just want to see who’s in the house.  We got Quad?  (Applause.)  Annex.  (Applause.)  Drew.  Carver.  Slow.  Towers.  And Meridian.  (Applause.)  Rest in peace, Meridian.  (Laughter.)  Rest in peace. I know you’re all excited today.  You might be a little tired, as well.  Some of you were up all night making sure your credits were in order.  (Laughter.)  Some of you stayed up too late, ended up at HoChi at 2:00 a.m.  (Laughter.)  Got some mambo sauce on your fingers.  (Laughter.)  But you got here.  And you’ve all worked hard to reach this day.  You’ve shuttled between challenging classes and Greek life.  You’ve led clubs, played an instrument or a sport.  You volunteered, you interned.  You held down one, two, maybe three jobs.  You’ve made lifelong friends and discovered exactly what you’re made of.  The “Howard Hustle” has strengthened your sense of purpose and ambition.  Which means you’re part of a long line of Howard graduates.  Some are on this stage today.  Some are in the audience.  That spirit of achievement and special responsibility has defined this campus ever since the Freedman’s Bureau established Howard just four years after the Emancipation Proclamation; just two years after the Civil War came to an end.  They created this university with a vision — a vision of uplift; a vision for an America where our fates would be determined not by our race, gender, religion or creed, but where we would be free — in every sense — to pursue our individual and collective dreams. It is that spirit that’s made Howard a centerpiece of African-American intellectual life and a central part of our larger American story.  This institution has been the home of many firsts:  The first black Nobel Peace Prize winner.  The first black Supreme Court justice.  But its mission has been to ensure those firsts were not the last.  Countless scholars, professionals, artists, and leaders from every field received their training here.  The generations of men and women who walked through this yard helped reform our government, cure disease, grow a black middle class, advance civil rights, shape our culture.  The seeds of change — for all Americans — were sown here.  And that’s what I want to talk about today. As I was preparing these remarks, I realized that when I was first elected President, most of you — the Class of 2016 — were just starting high school.  Today, you’re graduating college.  I used to joke about being old.  Now I realize I’m old.  (Laughter.)  It’s not a joke anymore.  (Laughter.) But seeing all of you here gives me some perspective.  It makes me reflect on the changes that I’ve seen over my own lifetime.  So let me begin with what may sound like a controversial statement — a hot take. Given the current state of our political rhetoric and debate, let me say something that may be controversial, and that is this:  America is a better place today than it was when I graduated from college.  (Applause.)  Let me repeat:  America is by almost every measure better than it was when I graduated from college.  It also happens to be better off than when I took office — (laughter) — but that’s a longer story.  (Applause.)  That’s a different discussion for another speech.  But think about it.  I graduated in 1983.  New York City, America’s largest city, where I lived at the time, had endured a decade marked by crime and deterioration and near bankruptcy.  And many cities were in similar shape.  Our nation had gone through years of economic stagnation, the stranglehold of foreign oil, a recession where unemployment nearly scraped 11 percent.  The auto industry was getting its clock cleaned by foreign competition.  And don’t even get me started on the clothes and the hairstyles.  I’ve tried to eliminate all photos of me from this period.  I thought I looked good.  (Laughter.)  I was wrong.  Since that year — since the year I graduated — the poverty rate is down.  Americans with college degrees, that rate is up.  Crime rates are down.  America’s cities have undergone a renaissance.  There are more women in the workforce.  They’re earning more money.  We’ve cut teen pregnancy in half.  We’ve slashed the African American dropout rate by almost 60 percent, and all of you have a computer in your pocket that gives you the world at the touch of a button.  In 1983, I was part of fewer than 10 percent of African Americans who graduated with a bachelor’s degree.  Today, you’re part of the more than 20 percent who will.  And more than half of blacks say we’re better off than our parents were at our age — and that our kids will be better off, too. So America is better.  And the world is better, too.  A wall came down in Berlin.  An Iron Curtain was torn asunder.  The obscenity of apartheid came to an end.  A young generation in Belfast and London have grown up without ever having to think about IRA bombings.  In just the past 16 years, we’ve come from a world without marriage equality to one where it’s a reality in nearly two dozen countries.  Around the world, more people live in democracies.  We’ve lifted more than 1 billion people from extreme poverty.  We’ve cut the child mortality rate worldwide by more than half.  America is better.  The world is better.  And stay with me now — race relations are better since I graduated.  That’s the truth.  No, my election did not create a post-racial society.  I don’t know who was propagating that notion.  That was not mine.    But the election itself — and the subsequent one — because the first one, folks might have made a mistake.  (Laughter.)  The second one, they knew what they were getting.  The election itself was just one indicator of how attitudes had changed.  In my inaugural address, I remarked that just 60 years earlier, my father might not have been served in a D.C. restaurant — at least not certain of them.  There were no black CEOs of Fortune 500 companies.  Very few black judges.  Shoot, as Larry Wilmore pointed out last week, a lot of folks didn’t even think blacks had the tools to be a quarterback.  Today, former Bull Michael Jordan isn’t just the greatest basketball player of all time — he owns the team.  (Laughter.)  When I was graduating, the main black hero on TV was Mr. T.  (Laughter.)  Rap and hip hop were counterculture, underground.  Now, Shonda Rhimes owns Thursday night, and Beyoncé runs the world.  (Laughter.)  We’re no longer only entertainers, we’re producers, studio executives.  No longer small business owners — we’re CEOs, we’re mayors, representatives, Presidents of the United States.  (Applause.) I am not saying gaps do not persist.  Obviously, they do.  Racism persists.  Inequality persists.  Don’t worry — I’m going to get to that.  But I wanted to start, Class of 2016, by opening your eyes to the moment that you are in.  If you had to choose one moment in history in which you could be born, and you didn’t know ahead of time who you were going to be — what nationality, what gender, what race, whether you’d be rich or poor, gay or straight, what faith you’d be born into — you wouldn’t choose 100 years ago.  You wouldn’t choose the fifties, or the sixties, or the seventies.  You’d choose right now.  If you had to choose a time to be, in the words of Lorraine Hansberry, “young, gifted, and black” in America, you would choose right now.  (Applause.) I tell you all this because it’s important to note progress.  Because to deny how far we’ve come would do a disservice to the cause of justice, to the legions of foot soldiers; to not only the incredibly accomplished individuals who have already been mentioned, but your mothers and your dads, and grandparents and great grandparents, who marched and toiled and suffered and overcame to make this day possible.  I tell you this not to lull you into complacency, but to spur you into action — because there’s still so much more work to do, so many more miles to travel.  And America needs you to gladly, happily take up that work.  You all have some work to do.  So enjoy the party, because you’re going to be busy.  (Laughter.)  Yes, our economy has recovered from crisis stronger than almost any other in the world.  But there are folks of all races who are still hurting — who still can’t find work that pays enough to keep the lights on, who still can’t save for retirement.  We’ve still got a big racial gap in economic opportunity.  The overall unemployment rate is 5 percent, but the Black unemployment rate is almost nine.  We’ve still got an achievement gap when black boys and girls graduate high school and college at lower rates than white boys and white girls.  Harriet Tubman may be going on the twenty, but we’ve still got a gender gap when a black woman working full-time still earns just 66 percent of what a white man gets paid.  (Applause.)  We’ve got a justice gap when too many Black boys and girls pass through a pipeline from underfunded schools to overcrowded jails.  This is one area where things have gotten worse.  When I was in college, about half a million people in America were behind bars.  Today, there are about 2.2 million.  Black men are about six times likelier to be in prison right now than white men.  Around the world, we’ve still got challenges to solve that threaten everybody in the 21st century — old scourges like disease and conflict, but also new challenges, from terrorism and climate change.  So make no mistake, Class of 2016 — you’ve got plenty of work to do.  But as complicated and sometimes intractable as these challenges may seem, the truth is that your generation is better positioned than any before you to meet those challenges, to flip the script.  Now, how you do that, how you meet these challenges, how you bring about change will ultimately be up to you.  My generation, like all generations, is too confined by our own experience, too invested in our own biases, too stuck in our ways to provide much of the new thinking that will be required.  But us old-heads have learned a few things that might be useful in your journey.  So with the rest of my time, I’d like to offer some suggestions for how young leaders like you can fulfill your destiny and shape our collective future — bend it in the direction of justice and equality and freedom. First of all — and this should not be a problem for this group — be confident in your heritage.  (Applause.)  Be confident in your Blackness.  One of the great changes that’s occurred in our country since I was your age is the realization there’s no one way to be black.  Take it from somebody who’s seen both sides of debate about whether I’m black enough.  (Laughter.)  In the past couple months, I’ve had lunch with the Queen of England and hosted Kendrick Lamar in the Oval Office.  There’s no straitjacket, there’s no constraints, there’s no litmus test for authenticity.  Look at Howard.  One thing most folks don’t know about Howard is how diverse it is.  When you arrived here, some of you were like, oh, they’ve got black people in Iowa?  (Laughter.)  But it’s true — this class comes from big cities and rural communities, and some of you crossed oceans to study here.  You shatter stereotypes.  Some of you come from a long line of Bison.  Some of you are the first in your family to graduate from college.  (Applause.)  You all talk different, you all dress different.  You’re Lakers fans, Celtics fans, maybe even some hockey fans.  (Laughter.)  And because of those who’ve come before you, you have models to follow.  You can work for a company, or start your own.  You can go into politics, or run an organization that holds politicians accountable.  You can write a book that wins the National Book Award, or you can write the new run of “Black Panther.”  Or, like one of your alumni, Ta-Nehisi Coates, you can go ahead and just do both.  You can create your own style, set your own standard of beauty, embrace your own sexuality.  Think about an icon we just lost — Prince.  He blew up categories.  People didn’t know what Prince was doing.  (Laughter.)  And folks loved him for it.  You need to have the same confidence.  Or as my daughters tell me all the time, “You be you, Daddy.”  (Laughter.)  Sometimes Sasha puts a variation on it — “You do you, Daddy.”  (Laughter.)  And because you’re a black person doing whatever it is that you’re doing, that makes it a black thing.  Feel confident. Second, even as we each embrace our own beautiful, unique, and valid versions of our blackness, remember the tie that does bind us as African Americans — and that is our particular awareness of injustice and unfairness and struggle.  That means we cannot sleepwalk through life.  We cannot be ignorant of history.  (Applause.)  We can’t meet the world with a sense of entitlement.  We can’t walk by a homeless man without asking why a society as wealthy as ours allows that state of affairs to occur.   We can’t just lock up a low-level dealer without asking why this boy, barely out of childhood, felt he had no other options.  We have cousins and uncles and brothers and sisters who we remember were just as smart and just as talented as we were, but somehow got ground down by structures that are unfair and unjust.  And that means we have to not only question the world as it is, and stand up for those African Americans who haven’t been so lucky — because, yes, you’ve worked hard, but you’ve also been lucky.  That’s a pet peeve of mine:  People who have been successful and don’t realize they’ve been lucky.  That God may have blessed them; it wasn’t nothing you did.  So don’t have an attitude.  But we must expand our moral imaginations to understand and empathize with all people who are struggling, not just black folks who are struggling — the refugee, the immigrant, the rural poor, the transgender person, and yes, the middle-aged white guy who you may think has all the advantages, but over the last several decades has seen his world upended by economic and cultural and technological change, and feels powerless to stop it.  You got to get in his head, too. Number three:  You have to go through life with more than just passion for change; you need a strategy.  I’ll repeat that.  I want you to have passion, but you have to have a strategy.  Not just awareness, but action.  Not just hashtags, but votes. You see, change requires more than righteous anger.  It requires a program, and it requires organizing.  At the 1964 Democratic Convention, Fannie Lou Hamer — all five-feet-four-inches tall — gave a fiery speech on the national stage.  But then she went back home to Mississippi and organized cotton pickers.  And she didn’t have the tools and technology where you can whip up a movement in minutes.  She had to go door to door.  And I’m so proud of the new guard of black civil rights leaders who understand this.  It’s thanks in large part to the activism of young people like many of you, from Black Twitter to Black Lives Matter, that America’s eyes have been opened — white, black, Democrat, Republican — to the real problems, for example, in our criminal justice system. But to bring about structural change, lasting change, awareness is not enough.  It requires changes in law, changes in custom.  If you care about mass incarceration, let me ask you:  How are you pressuring members of Congress to pass the criminal justice reform bill now pending before them?  (Applause.)  If you care about better policing, do you know who your district attorney is?  Do you know who your state’s attorney general is?  Do you know the difference?  Do you know who appoints the police chief and who writes the police training manual?  Find out who they are, what their responsibilities are.  Mobilize the community, present them with a plan, work with them to bring about change, hold them accountable if they do not deliver.  Passion is vital, but you’ve got to have a strategy. And your plan better include voting — not just some of the time, but all the time.  (Applause.)  It is absolutely true that 50 years after the Voting Rights Act, there are still too many barriers in this country to vote.  There are too many people trying to erect new barriers to voting.  This is the only advanced democracy on Earth that goes out of its way to make it difficult for people to vote.  And there’s a reason for that.  There’s a legacy to that. But let me say this:  Even if we dismantled every barrier to voting, that alone would not change the fact that America has some of the lowest voting rates in the free world.  In 2014, only 36 percent of Americans turned out to vote in the midterms — the secondlowest participation rate on record.  Youth turnout — that would be you — was less than 20 percent.  Less than 20 percent.  Four out of five did not vote.  In 2012, nearly two in three African Americans turned out.  And then, in 2014, only two in five turned out.  You don’t think that made a difference in terms of the Congress I’ve got to deal with?  And then people are wondering, well, how come Obama hasn’t gotten this done?  How come he didn’t get that done?  You don’t think that made a difference?  What would have happened if you had turned out at 50, 60, 70 percent, all across this country?  People try to make this political thing really complicated.  Like, what kind of reforms do we need?  And how do we need to do that?  You know what, just vote.  It’s math.  If you have more votes than the other guy, you get to do what you want.  (Laughter.)  It’s not that complicated.  And you don’t have excuses.   You don’t have to guess the number of jellybeans in a jar or bubbles on a bar of soap to register to vote.  You don’t have to risk your life to cast a ballot.  Other people already did that for you.  (Applause.) Your grandparents, your great grandparents might be here today if they were working on it.  What’s your excuse?  When we don’t vote, we give away our power, disenfranchise ourselves — right when we need to use the power that we have; right when we need your power to stop others from taking away the vote and rights of those more vulnerable than you are — the elderly and the poor, the formerly incarcerated trying to earn their second chance.So you got to vote all the time, not just when it’s cool, not just when it’s time to elect a President, not just when you’re inspired.  It’s your duty.  When it’s time to elect a member of Congress or a city councilman, or a school board member, or a sheriff.  That’s how we change our politics — by electing people at every level who are representative of and accountable to us.  It is not that complicated.  Don’t make it complicated. And finally, change requires more than just speaking out — it requires listening, as well.  In particular, it requires listening to those with whom you disagree, and being prepared to compromise.  When I was a state senator, I helped pass Illinois’s first racial profiling law, and one of the first laws in the nation requiring the videotaping of confessions in capital cases.  And we were successful because, early on, I engaged law enforcement.  I didn’t say to them, oh, you guys are so racist, you need to do something.  I understood, as many of you do, that the overwhelming majority of police officers are good, and honest, and courageous, and fair, and love the communities they serve.  And we knew there were some bad apples, and that even the good cops with the best of intentions — including, by the way, African American police officers — might have unconscious biases, as we all do.  So we engaged and we listened, and we kept working until we built consensus.  And because we took the time to listen, we crafted legislation that was good for the police — because it improved the trust and cooperation of the community — and it was good for the communities, who were less likely to be treated unfairly.  And I can say this unequivocally:  Without at least the acceptance of the police organizations in Illinois, I could never have gotten those bills passed.  Very simple.  They would have blocked them.  The point is, you need allies in a democracy.  That’s just the way it is.  It can be frustrating and it can be slow.  But history teaches us that the alternative to democracy is always worse.  That’s not just true in this country.  It’s not a black or white thing.  Go to any country where the give and take of democracy has been repealed by one-party rule, and I will show you a country that does not work.  And democracy requires compromise, even when you are 100 percent right.  This is hard to explain sometimes.  You can be completely right, and you still are going to have to engage folks who disagree with you.  If you think that the only way forward is to be as uncompromising as possible, you will feel good about yourself, you will enjoy a certain moral purity, but you’re not going to get what you want.  And if you don’t get what you want long enough, you will eventually think the whole system is rigged.  And that will lead to more cynicism, and less participation, and a downward spiral of more injustice and more anger and more despair.  And that’s never been the source of our progress.  That’s how we cheat ourselves of progress. We remember Dr. King’s soaring oratory, the power of his letter from a Birmingham jail, the marches he led.  But he also sat down with President Johnson in the Oval Office to try and get a Civil Rights Act and a Voting Rights Act passed.  And those two seminal bills were not perfect — just like the Emancipation Proclamation was a war document as much as it was some clarion call for freedom.  Those mileposts of our progress were not perfect.  They did not make up for centuries of slavery or Jim Crow or eliminate racism or provide for 40 acres and a mule.  But they made things better.  And you know what, I will take better every time.  I always tell my staff — better is good, because you consolidate your gains and then you move on to the next fight from a stronger position.  Brittany Packnett, a member of the Black Lives Matter movement and Campaign Zero, one of the Ferguson protest organizers, she joined our Task Force on 21st Century Policing.  Some of her fellow activists questioned whether she should participate.  She rolled up her sleeves and sat at the same table with big city police chiefs and prosecutors.  And because she did, she ended up shaping many of the recommendations of that task force.  And those recommendations are now being adopted across the country — changes that many of the protesters called for.  If young activists like Brittany had refused to participate out of some sense of ideological purity, then those great ideas would have just remained ideas.  But she did participate.  And that’s how change happens. America is big and it is boisterous and it is more diverse than ever.  The president told me that we’ve got a significant Nepalese contingent here at Howard.  I would not have guessed that.  Right on.  But it just tells you how interconnected we’re becoming.  And with so many folks from so many places, converging, we are not always going to agree with each other.  Another Howard alum, Zora Neale Hurston, once said — this is a good quote here:  “Nothing that God ever made is the same thing to more than one person.”  Think about that.  That’s why our democracy gives us a process designed for us to settle our disputes with argument and ideas and votes instead of violence and simple majority rule.  So don’t try to shut folks out, don’t try to shut them down, no matter how much you might disagree with them.  There’s been a trend around the country of trying to get colleges to disinvite speakers with a different point of view, or disrupt a politician’s rally.  Don’t do that — no matter how ridiculous or offensive you might find the things that come out of their mouths.  Because as my grandmother used to tell me, every time a fool speaks, they are just advertising their own ignorance.  Let them talk.  Let them talk.  If you don’t, you just make them a victim, and then they can avoid accountability.  That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t challenge them.  Have the confidence to challenge them, the confidence in the rightness of your position.  There will be times when you shouldn’t compromise your core values, your integrity, and you will have the responsibility to speak up in the face of injustice.  But listen.  Engage.  If the other side has a point, learn from them.  If they’re wrong, rebut them.  Teach them.  Beat them on the battlefield of ideas.  And you might as well start practicing now, because one thing I can guarantee you — you will have to deal with ignorance, hatred, racism, foolishness, trifling folks.  (Laughter.)  I promise you, you will have to deal with all that at every stage of your life.  That may not seem fair, but life has never been completely fair.  Nobody promised you a crystal stair.  And if you want to make life fair, then you’ve got to start with the world as it is. So that’s my advice.  That’s how you change things.  Change isn’t something that happens every four years or eight years; change is not placing your faith in any particular politician and then just putting your feet up and saying, okay, go.  Change is the effort of committed citizens who hitch their wagons to something bigger than themselves and fight for it every single day.  That’s what Thurgood Marshall understood — a man who once walked this year, graduated from Howard Law; went home to Baltimore, started his own law practice.  He and his mentor, Charles Hamilton Houston, rolled up their sleeves and they set out to overturn segregation.  They worked through the NAACP.  Filed dozens of lawsuits, fought dozens of cases.  And after nearly 20 years of effort — 20 years — Thurgood Marshall ultimately succeeded in bringing his righteous cause before the Supreme Court, and securing the ruling in Brown v. Board of Education that separate could never be equal.  (Applause.)  Twenty years.  Marshall, Houston — they knew it would not be easy.  They knew it would not be quick.  They knew all sorts of obstacles would stand in their way.  They knew that even if they won, that would just be the beginning of a longer march to equality.  But they had discipline.  They had persistence.  They had faith — and a sense of humor.  And they made life better for all Americans. And I know you graduates share those qualities.  I know it because I’ve learned about some of the young people graduating here today.  There’s a young woman named Ciearra Jefferson, who’s graduating with you.  And I’m just going to use her as an example.  I hope you don’t mind, Ciearra.  Ciearra grew up in Detroit and was raised by a poor single mom who worked seven days a week in an auto plant.  And for a time, her family found themselves without a place to call home.  They bounced around between friends and family who might take them in.  By her senior year, Ciearra was up at 5:00 am every day, juggling homework, extracurricular activities, volunteering, all while taking care of her little sister.  But she knew that education was her ticket to a better life.  So she never gave up.  Pushed herself to excel.  This daughter of a single mom who works on the assembly line turned down a full scholarship to Harvard to come to Howard.  (Applause.)  And today, like many of you, Ciearra is the first in her family to graduate from college.  And then, she says, she’s going to go back to her hometown, just like Thurgood Marshall did, to make sure all the working folks she grew up with have access to the health care they need and deserve.  As she puts it, she’s going to be a “change agent.”  She’s going to reach back and help folks like her succeed. And people like Ciearra are why I remain optimistic about America.  (Applause.)  Young people like you are why I never give in to despair.  James Baldwin once wrote, “Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” Graduates, each of us is only here because someone else faced down challenges for us.  We are only who we are because someone else struggled and sacrificed for us.  That’s not just Thurgood Marshall’s story, or Ciearra’s story, or my story, or your story — that is the story of America.  A story whispered by slaves in the cotton fields, the song of marchers in Selma, the dream of a King in the shadow of Lincoln.  The prayer of immigrants who set out for a new world.  The roar of women demanding the vote.  The rallying cry of workers who built America.  And the GIs who bled overseas for our freedom.  Now it’s your turn.  And the good news is, you’re ready.  And when your journey seems too hard, and when you run into a chorus of cynics who tell you that you’re being foolish to keep believing or that you can’t do something, or that you should just give up, or you should just settle — you might say to yourself a little phrase that I’ve found handy these last eight years:  Yes, we can. Congratulations, Class of 2016!  (Applause.)  Good luck!  God bless you.  God bless the United States of America.  I’m proud of you.                                   END                12:33 P.M. EDT (May 7, 2016) 11:47 A.M. EDT President Barack Obama delivers Howard University’s commencement speech during the 2016 Howard University graduation ceremony in Washington, Saturday, May 7, 2016. Obama says the country is “a better place today” than when he graduated from college more than 30 years ago, citing his historic election as “one indicator of how attitudes have changed.” ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)(Howard UniversityWashington, D.C.)last_img read more

Pastors For Hogan Coalition Join Growing Democratic Coalition for Hogan

Pastors For Hogan Coalition Join Growing Democratic Coalition for Hogan

first_imgBy Hamil R. Harris, Special to the AFROA coalition of African-American pastors announced its support for Maryland Governor Larry Hogan.  This proclamation comes at a time when some of the state’s top Democratic veterans privately say Ben Jealous is losing ground in his bid to unseat the Republican governor, even during the era of President Donald Trump.Baltimore and Prince George’s County are critical for any chances of Jealous winning and this is why the endorsement of a number of prominent pastors is a political body blow to the former President and CEO of the NAACP.  Further two of the pastors are leaders in the Progressive National Baptist Convention, which was formed by pastors aligned with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.Black Pastors such as the Rev. Anthony Maclin of the Sanctuary at Kingdom Square in Prince George’s County are supporting Maryland’s Governor Larry Hogan (R) who is running against Democrat and former NAACP President and CEO Ben Jealous.“The gubernatorial leadership of Governor Hogan for our great state has been, and continues to be, insightful, thoughtful and respectful,” said the Rev. Dr. Harold Carter Jr. of the New Shiloh Baptist Church in Baltimore, according to a statement released by the Hogan campaign. “His administration has been one of inclusivity and stability. We are the better for what he, along with Lt. Gov. Rutherford, bring to the table.”The Rev. Anthony Maclin, pastor of the Sanctuary at Kingdom Square, in Capital Heights, Md., is also supporting Hogan and said in a statement, “This governor has brought people together, reaching across political lines for the betterment of the people of the great state of Maryland.”The endorsement of these pastors came during a time where Jealous is being seen at major African American events such as the Morgan State Homecoming last weekend and the Prince George’s County Chamber of Commerce Gala at National Harbor. Privately, at both venues, leaders say Jealous is losing to Hogan in terms of a good ground game and African Americans like what Hogan has done.In terms of the faith community the pastors supporting Hogan are major players.“The Hogan/Rutherford team has proven to be thoughtful leaders,” said the Rev. Dr. Alvin Hathaway Sr., pastor of Baltimore’s Union Baptist Church. “I’ve found them willing to listen, debate and collaborate. These are the skills needed in this highly partisan climate. Together we are planning major changes in the west Baltimore community I serve.”The Rev. Dr. Calvin Baltimore of the Peoples Community Church in Silver Spring, Md., said, “These men are giving Maryland stellar leadership. I and other ministers and friends will be supporting these great men for re-election.”In addition to touting $25 billion for K-12 education, including $3.8 billion for Baltimore City, Hogan said in a statement that his administration, “has also taken strong action and spoken out against hatred and divisiveness in Maryland,” and has allocated money to improve security passed laws to strengthen hate crime laws.In terms of the endorsement, Hogan said in a statement, “These pastors are pillars of their communities and it is a privilege and an honor to receive their support.“I have been grateful to receive their wisdom and moral guidance during my first term. I look forward to working with them as we continue changing Maryland for the better.”Rutherford, another key to Hogan’s support, said, “Our administration has made building strong communities throughout Maryland a top priority, and these pastors have been vital allies in that effort.”last_img read more